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April 17, 2014 | NPR · Scientists and food activists are launching a campaign to promote seeds that can be freely shared, rather than protected through patents and licenses. They call it the Open Source Seed Initiative.
 
April 17, 2014 | NPR · Brazil is the spiritual home of soccer and a world powerhouse in the sport. It's woven into the Brazilian psyche. Wins and losses have had repercussions in other realms — including politics.
 
April 17, 2014 | NPR · Last week marked another low-point in the Syrian civil war. A unidentified gunman assassinated a Dutch priest in the city of Homs. Father Frans van der Lugt had lived in Syria for nearly five decades.
 

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April 16, 2014 | NPR · Ukrainian tanks arrived in the city of Kramatorsk Wednesday morning. By the time they rolled out of the city, they were flying Russian flags. People in Kramatorsk tell the story of what happened.
 
April 16, 2014 | NPR · NATO has announced a strengthening of its forces near the alliance's eastern border. Gen. George Joulwan, the former NATO supreme allied commander for Europe, discusses the plan.
 
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April 16, 2014 | NPR · A 325 million-year-old fossil find shows that the gill structures of modern sharks are actually quite different from their ancient ancestors.
 

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April 12, 2014 | NPR · As pro-Russia demonstrators continue their tense standoff in Eastern Ukraine, police are conspicuously absent from city streets.
 

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April 13, 2014 | NPR · As the anniversary of last year's marathon bombing approaches, NPR's Rachel Martin speaks with correspondent Carrie Johnson about the investigation and legal wrangling yet to come.
 

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Middle class

Oct 21, 2013 — In softcover fiction, Emma Donoghue imagines migrations and meanderings. In nonfiction, David Denby warns of film's descent into spectacle; Jake Tapper memorializes an ill-fated military outpost; Donald L. Barlett and James B. Steele examine the dwindling American middle class; and Caleb Daniloff puts on his running shoes to confront his demons.
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Aug 6, 2012 — Journalists Donald Barlett and James Steele say a government commitment to free trade and an indifference to offshoring of jobs has crippled the middle class. And, they say, that situation is unlikely to change, no matter who wins this year's presidential election.
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Aug 9, 2011 — The Great Depression transformed families and launched political movements. In Pinched, author Don Peck tracks the decades-long impact of American downturns on culture, politics and psychology; and predicts how the most recent economic shock could alter the nation's psyche.
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Aug 8, 2011 — NPR coverage of Pinched: How the Great Recession Has Narrowed Our Futures and What We Can Do About It by Don Peck. News, author interviews, critics' picks and more.
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Oct 5, 2010 — Gustave Flaubert was an apostle of le mot juste — using exactly the right word. Lydia Davis elegantly translates his masterpiece, Madame Bovary, in the same spirit. Davis' words lure readers back into Emma Bovary's sexy, scandalous and tragic tale.
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Jan 22, 2008 — Politics and parallel lives serve as a backdrop for the complexities of marriage in Sue Miller's new novel. The Senator's Wife is the ninth work of fiction from the bestselling author.
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Dec 29, 2007 — Novelist Sue Miller's latest book, The Senator's Wife, revolves around the long-suffering wife of a promiscuous, charismatic politician and the idealistic young couple who move in next door.
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Jan 30, 2007 — Sen. Chuck Schumer (D-NY) was elected to Congress at the age of 29 and served in the House of Representatives for eight years. He just began his second term as a Senator. He is a member of the Senate Democratic Leadership team, and sits on the Senate Finance Committee; the Committee on Banking, Housing, and Urban Affairs; and the Judiciary Committee. His new book is Positively American: Winning Back the Middle-Class Majority One Family At a Time.
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May 11, 2005 — Ed Gordon speaks with author, minister and scholar Michael Eric Dyson about the effects of Bill Cosby's controversial remarks aimed at certain African-American communities. Dyson's new book is Is Bill Cosby Right: Or Has The Black Middle Class Lost Its Mind?
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May 3, 2005 — A year ago, Bill Cosby set off a national debate in a speech to the NAACP where he criticized poor blacks in sometimes harsh language. Cosby emphasized personal responsibility, or the lack of it. In a new book, Michael Eric Dyson describes Cosby's remarks as a vicious attack on the most vulnerable among us.
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