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April 18, 2014 | NPR · The agreement calls on all parties to refrain from violence, requires that illegally-armed groups disarm and that control of government buildings be returned to Ukrainian authorities.
 
April 18, 2014 | NPR · President Obama said enrollment under the Affordable Care Act reached 8 million after the deadline was extended by 2 weeks. The figure represents a turnaround from the disastrous debut of the website.
 
April 18, 2014 | NPR · Morning Edition spent a lot of time recently reporting from the U.S.-Mexico border. President Obama has deported 2 million people from the U.S. But many say that number is misleading.
 

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April 18, 2014 | NPR · It looks as though the "comment period" for the controversial Keystone XL pipeline project will be extended, delaying a decision past the November elections.
 
April 18, 2014 | NPR · Regular political commentators, E.J. Dionne of The Washington Post and David Brooks of The New York Times, discuss the breakthrough Ukraine deal and the new health care enrollment numbers.
 
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April 18, 2014 | NPR · Ivan Soltesz studies epilepsy in mice, but says children with chronic seizures are his inspiration. He's closing in on a way to quell the seizures with light — and without drugs' side effects.
 

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April 19, 2014 | NPR · The search continues for hundreds of people, mostly students, who were on board a South Korean ferry when it sank this week. Correspondent Anthony Kuhn shares the latest with NPR's Wade Goodwyn.
 

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April 13, 2014 | NPR · As the anniversary of last year's marathon bombing approaches, NPR's Rachel Martin speaks with correspondent Carrie Johnson about the investigation and legal wrangling yet to come.
 

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Drama

Dec 27, 2012 — This year's literary heroines aren't defined by their desire to love or be loved — or even to be especially lovable. Writer and critic Parul Sehgal celebrates five sublimely stubborn women, frequently at odds with themselves and always at odds with their times.
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Apr 16, 2009 — The younger of the filmmaking Coen brothers is the author of two recently published books. Almost An Evening consists of three short plays that were staged off-Broadway last year, while The Drunken Driver Has The Right Of Way is a slim volume of clever, light verse.
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Jan 24, 2008 — During his most recent visit to Iraq, New Yorker writer George Packer focused on stories of Iraqis who have worked as translators, fixers and drivers for the U.S. government, military and media. He has now adapted his story, "Betrayed: The Iraqis Who Trusted America the Most," into a new play.
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Jan 14, 2008 — Each year, at the American Library Association's mid-winter meeting, the winners of the most prestigious prizes for children's books are announced: the Caldecott Medal for picture book, and the Newbery Award.
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Jul 15, 2007 — At just 33, playwright Sarah Ruhl has already had her plays produced on the country's most important stages. But she still finds time to read Goodnight Moon. She shares what's on her reading list this summer.
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Sep 3, 2006 — This summer, we've talked to authors, scientists, performers and others to find out what they've been reading, for work and for fun. We also asked our listeners to tell us what books have kept them up through the night, eager to find out how the story ends.
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Jun 16, 2006 — South African playwright Athol Fugard's work has long been esteemed around the world. Now his daughter, Lisa Fugard, has published a first novel: Skinner's Drift. Father and daughter talk about apartheid-era South Africa and what inspires their respective creative works.
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May 6, 2006 — Author Joseph L. Badaracco Jr. thinks future business leaders can learn something from literary classics. His book Questions of Character offers lessons from eight major works.
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Dec 7, 2004 — The Greek myth of the fate of Eurydice, who dies after being saved from Hades by Orpheus, provides the kernel of one of Pulitzer Prize-winner Paula Vogel's favorite scenes. Vogel discusses Sarah Ruhl's vision of Eurydice with NPR's Susan Stamberg.
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Nov 30, 2004 — Writer Suzan-Lori Parks has won acclaim for her depictions of modern African-American life. The Pulitzer Prize-winning author of Topdog/Underdog discusses two of her favorite dramatic scenes, from The Sound of Music and Taxi Driver.
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