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August 22, 2014 | NPR · The standoff between the U.S. and Russia over Ukraine has raised the specter of a new Cold War. David Greene talks to Julie Ioffe, of the New Republic, about what Russia's next move may be in Ukraine.
 
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August 22, 2014 | NPR · Even just the word Ebola is kind of terrifying. Why? Hollywood has a lot to do with it. But Ebola outbreaks also have all the ingredients for what one psychologist calls the "dread factor."
 
August 22, 2014 | NPR · Census Bureau data show a wider gap between rich and poor. Kelly McEvers explores this with economist Enrico Moretti of the University of California-Berkeley, author of The New Geography of Jobs.
 

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August 22, 2014 | NPR · It's been another rough August for President Obama. He's wrapping up a summer vacation marred by events in Ferguson, Mo., and the murder of an American journalist in the Middle East.
 
August 22, 2014 | NPR · Regular political commentators, E.J. Dionne of The Washington Post and Reihan Salam of The National Review, discuss the killing of American journalist James Foley and the ongoing conflict in Ferguson, Mo.
 
August 22, 2014 | NPR · The scent of fresh pencils is in the air, and homework assignments are around the corner. In honor of back-to-school season, author Alexander Aciman recommends The Lost Estate by Henri Alain-Fournier.
 

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August 16, 2014 | NPR · Both Ukraine and Russia say they're trying to send supplies to residents in eastern Ukraine. But with tensions on both sides running high, that aid may take a while to arrive.
 

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August 17, 2014 | NPR · American fighter jets and drones carried out airstrikes against Islamist targets near the Mosul Dam in northern Iraq on Saturday. A breach of the dam could threaten entire cities.
 

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David Maraniss

Jan 29, 2013 — In softcover fiction and nonfiction, John Irving explores teen lust; Denise Mina delivers a murder mystery; David Maraniss looks at the young Barack Obama; Robert Kagan defends U.S. sovereignty; and Susan Cain stands up for introverts.
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Dec 28, 2012 — Our list of this year's best biographies focuses on books about individuals who lived their lives off the beaten path. From the story of a spy turned chef to the story of the real Count of Monte Cristo, these books chronicle subjects who refused to conform to the expectations of others.
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Jun 17, 2012 — In Barack Obama: The Story, journalist David Maraniss chronicles the president's "classic search for home." Maraniss says Obama's young life was defined by his experience of being an outsider — a feeling that stayed with him well into early adulthood.
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May 24, 2012 — Critic Michael Schaub offers a sneak peek at some of the most hotly anticipated books of the summer: An Obama bio. A sparkling debut. Thrillers of both the fictional and body-science kind. Even Lincoln is reborn in this season of sun, sand, renewal — and reading.
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Aug 4, 2008 — The 1960 Olympics in Rome, which took place against a backdrop of growing political and social tensions, introduced great athletes like Cassius Clay and Rafer Johnson. In a new book, journalist David Maraniss chronicles these pivotal games.
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Jul 3, 2008 — It seems that wherever the Olympic Games go, politics will follow. And no competition was more political than the 1960 summer Olympics in Rome. For more, Farai Chideya speaks with journalist David Maraniss.
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Jun 2, 2006 — Matt Tannenbaum of The Bookstore in Lenox, Mass., recommends Clemente: The Passion and Grace of Baseball's Last Hero by David Maraniss in his conversation about summer reading with Susan Stamberg on Morning Edition.
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Apr 30, 2006 — Today's many Latino baseball stars owe a debt to Roberto Clemente, the first Latino ballplayer to rise to U.S. stardom. Clemente died at 38, delivering supplies to earthquake survivors in Nicaragua. His life is the subject of a new biography by Pulitzer-winner David Maraniss.
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