Latest News from NPR

on:

NCPR is supported by:

 
Hourly Newscast
4 min., 45 sec.

Programs

Latest program rundown

Coming up:

Latest Features:
July 23, 2014 | NPR · A number of major airlines have suspended service to and from Tel Aviv as the fighting between Israel and Hamas in Gaza intensifies. That's leaving passengers to find other arrangements.
 
AP
July 23, 2014 | NPR · The vice president has been traveling the country to learn about the best ways to train workers. He announced the results Tuesday as the president signed a workforce training bill into law.
 
AP
July 23, 2014 | NPR · Congress is supposed to hold U.S. spy agencies accountable. But as Edward Snowden's disclosures revealed, intelligence officials have not always provided a full or accurate picture.
 

Latest program rundown

Coming up:

Latest Features:
July 23, 2014 | NPR · The remains of passengers of the downed Malaysia Airlines flight arrived in the Netherlands, on what has been a national day of mourning. Most of those killed in the jet that was brought down over Ukraine were Dutch. Robert Siegel talks with Thomas Erdbrink of The New York Times, who is in the Netherlands.
 
AFP/Getty Images
July 23, 2014 | NPR · Even before the double calamity of its two downed flights, Malaysia Airlines was trying to adapt to momentous shifts in Asia's aviation industry. Now, it faces either bankruptcy or privatization.
 
July 23, 2014 | NPR · An uncontacted Amazonian tribe has ended its isolation in Brazil. Fiona Watson, the field and research director for Survival International, explains why this tribal people left its village.
 

Latest Saturday rundown




WE Saturday Feature

July 19, 2014 | NPR · NPR's Scott Simon talks with David Herzsenhorn of The New York Times about the latest developments in Ukraine, where a Malaysia Airlines passenger plane was downed on Thursday, killing 298 people.
 

Latest Sunday rundown


WE Sunday Feature

July 20, 2014 | NPR · NPR's Arun Rath gets the latest from correspondent Corey Flintoff at the site of last week's downing of a Malaysian jetliner in Eastern Ukraine.
 

Latest program rundown

Coming up:

Disaster relief

Jul 29, 2008 — In her new book, The Unthinkable: Who Survives When Disaster Strikes — and Why, journalist Amanda Ripley searches for patterns in human behavior in response to emergency situations.
Launch in player | Comments |
Jul 22, 2008Time magazine reporter Amanda Ripley takes readers inside fires, floods and airplane crashes in The Unthinkable, a disquieting study of disaster psychology.
Launch in player | Comments |
Sep 1, 2007 — When Hurricane Katrina swept into New Orleans, accurate information was often the rarest commodity. As water inundated New Orleans, the city's dominant paper, The Times-Picayune, found its true calling.
Launch in player | Comments |
Aug 29, 2006 — Laura Dawn, cultural director of MoveOn.org, edited It Takes a Nation: How Strangers Became Family in the Wake of Hurricane Katrina. The book collects oral histories and photos of storm evacuees and those who helped them.
Launch in player | Comments |
Aug 28, 2006 — Jed Horne, an editor at The New Orleans Times-Picayune, talks about the city's continuing struggle to start over. Also offering their observations: Patrina Peters, a lifelong resident of the Lower Ninth Ward, who is featured in Horne's book Breach of Faith, and Charlotte Lewis, who just returned to the city after 11 months.
Launch in player | Comments |
Jul 10, 2006 — Even after the extensive coverage of Hurricane Katrina, New Orleans journalist Jason Berry say there's much to be learned from new books on the storm: about global warming, how cities live or die, the science of levees and stunning human dramas.
Launch in player | Comments |
May 22, 2006 — In The Great Deluge, Douglas Brinkley describes a city ripe for disaster as Hurricane Katrina approached shore — crippled by poverty, police corruption, gang violence and lacking a real, workable disaster plan.
Launch in player | Comments |
May 10, 2006 — Historian Douglas Brinkley, a New Orleans resident and professor at Tulane University, talks about his new book, The Great Deluge. Brinkley left the city just after Hurricane Katrina hit last year, but returned to help with rescue efforts and began collecting oral histories about the catastrophe.
Launch in player | Comments |
more Disaster relief from NPR