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August 21, 2014 | NPR · The attorney general hugged community leaders, a highway patrol captain and the mother of Michael Brown during his visit, and got an update on the federal investigation into the teen's shooting.
 
August 21, 2014 | NPR · At McCluer High School, 30 varsity football players — all black, mostly from Ferguson — practice. David Greene talks to Sports Illustrated writer Robert Klemko about his story, "Football in Ferguson."
 
August 21, 2014 | NPR · Kelly McEvers talks to Syria expert Shashank Joshi, about President Bashar al-Assad's tenacious grip on power. Joshi is with the Royal Services Institute in London.
 

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August 20, 2014 | NPR · Demonstrators want an indictment of the police officer who fatally shot Michael Brown earlier this month. But investigations — one of them a federal civil rights case — can take weeks, if not months.
 
August 20, 2014 | NPR · More than a week now from the police shooting in Ferguson, Mo., it's worth asking: Ideally, what should happen with a police officer stops someone in the street?
 
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August 20, 2014 | NPR · Enlisting has been a rite of passage for men in the Pierce family since the Civil War. And as America has changed, Mark Pierce and his son Jeremy explain, what it means to serve has, too.
 

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August 16, 2014 | NPR · Both Ukraine and Russia say they're trying to send supplies to residents in eastern Ukraine. But with tensions on both sides running high, that aid may take a while to arrive.
 

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August 17, 2014 | NPR · American fighter jets and drones carried out airstrikes against Islamist targets near the Mosul Dam in northern Iraq on Saturday. A breach of the dam could threaten entire cities.
 

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Disaster victims

Jul 28, 2011 — NPR coverage of Zeitoun by Dave Eggers. News, author interviews, critics' picks and more.
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Jul 15, 2011 — NPR coverage of City of Refuge: A Novel by Tom Piazza. News, author interviews, critics' picks and more.
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Jul 14, 2011 — NPR coverage of One Amazing Thing by Chitra Banerjee Divakaruni. News, author interviews, critics' picks and more.
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Feb 23, 2010 — Reviewer Jane Ciabattari says the new novel by Chitra Banerjee Divakaruni takes the shape of Scheherazade's tales, as nine people begin sharing their life stories after being trapped in the basement passport office of San Fransisco's Indian Consulate after an earthquake.
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Aug 29, 2009 — How is New Orleans holding up four years after Katrina? Author Tom Piazza's new novel City of Refuge traces the journeys of a handful of locals — some who died, others scattered across the country. Piazza tells Guy Raz that New Orleans is slowly getting to be New Orleans again.
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Jul 25, 2009 — Abdulrahman Zeitoun was arrested just after Hurricane Katrina hit New Orleans. The Syrian immigrant had lived in the city for more than 20 years. Author Dave Eggers says Zeitoun found himself in "a perfect intersection" between a natural disaster and the war on terrorism.
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Jul 29, 2008 — In her new book, The Unthinkable: Who Survives When Disaster Strikes — and Why, journalist Amanda Ripley searches for patterns in human behavior in response to emergency situations.
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Jul 22, 2008Time magazine reporter Amanda Ripley takes readers inside fires, floods and airplane crashes in The Unthinkable, a disquieting study of disaster psychology.
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Jul 24, 2007 — Author Joshua Clark rode out Hurricane Katrina in his home in the French Quarter, and became our eyes and ears in New Orleans. He discusses his memoir, Heart Like Water, and his life the in the aftermath of the storm.
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Aug 28, 2006 — Jed Horne, an editor at The New Orleans Times-Picayune, talks about the city's continuing struggle to start over. Also offering their observations: Patrina Peters, a lifelong resident of the Lower Ninth Ward, who is featured in Horne's book Breach of Faith, and Charlotte Lewis, who just returned to the city after 11 months.
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