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April 16, 2014 | NPR · Schoolgirls were kidnapped in Nigeria Tuesday. The suspects are believed to be with a radical group blamed for a bombing Monday. Kelly McEvers talks to Michelle Faul of The Associated Press.
 
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April 16, 2014 | NPR · Fans and foes want to know whether the Affordable Care Act is meeting its goals. But, for good reasons, there are no clear answers yet.
 
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April 16, 2014 | NPR · A year after the Boston Marathon bombing, Heather Abbott has adapted to life with her prostheses, including a blade for running and one that allows her to wear her favorite shoes.
 

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April 15, 2014 | NPR · One year has passed since bombs rocked the finish line of the Boston Marathon. The city honored victims of the tragedy Tuesday with a tribute, including speeches from three of the victims themselves.
 
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April 15, 2014 | WBUR · At last year's Boston Marathon, Carol Downing was just half a mile from the finish line when bombs exploded and injured two of her daughters. This year, she's returning to complete the race.
 
April 15, 2014 | NPR · Each April, the shad come back to the Delaware River to spawn, and thousands of anglers in New Jersey and Pennsylvania eagerly await them. Celebrating their annual return is a local spring tradition.
 

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April 12, 2014 | NPR · As pro-Russia demonstrators continue their tense standoff in Eastern Ukraine, police are conspicuously absent from city streets.
 

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April 13, 2014 | NPR · As the anniversary of last year's marathon bombing approaches, NPR's Rachel Martin speaks with correspondent Carrie Johnson about the investigation and legal wrangling yet to come.
 

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Urban renewal

Nov 12, 2013 — In softcover fiction, Katherine Marsh searches the heavens for a teenage dwarf's destiny and Juliann Garey approaches a bipolar life from three different angles. In softcover nonfiction, Jeff Speck paces the city streets and Ezekiel Emanuel reflects on the family life of three brothers with a few sharp angles of their own.
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Nov 17, 2012 — City planner Jeff Speck says walking will remain a choice in most American cities for years to come, but that it's important to incentivize pedestrians. In his book, Walkable City, Speck says urban walks have to be useful, safe, comfortable and interesting.
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Aug 19, 2012 — Hurricanes Katrina and Rita, the devastating losses and the inept government response, dominated the news cycle for a few months. But New Orleans residents' struggle to return home never stopped. Writer Daniel Wolff's new book follows several Crescent City characters as they rebuild after the disaster.
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Mar 2, 2012 — In The House I Loved, a woman reflects on the reconstruction of Paris. It debuts at No. 8.
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Jul 23, 2008 — What happens when an entrenched culture suddenly opts for rapid change and the upheaval of centuries of cherished tradition? Maureen Corrigan finds some answers in two new works of nonfiction.
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Jul 20, 2006 — Is gentrification a bad word or a good influence? Lance Freeman, an assistant professor at Columbia University, talks with Farai Chideya about his new book exploring the gentrification of two predominately black neighborhoods in New York City — Manhattan's Harlem and Brooklyn's Clinton Hill.
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Nov 29, 2004 — Author Joshua Olsen talks about Better Places, Better Lives. It's a biography of James Rouse, the renowned city planner behind the shopping mall. Rouse planned Columbia, Md., one of the best-planned communities in America, but some of his other ideas for saving America's cities and controlling urban sprawl didn't meet his expectations.
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