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August 22, 2014 | NPR · The standoff between the U.S. and Russia over Ukraine has raised the specter of a new Cold War. David Greene talks to Julie Ioffe, of the New Republic, about what Russia's next move may be in Ukraine.
 
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August 22, 2014 | NPR · Even just the word Ebola is kind of terrifying. Why? Hollywood has a lot to do with it. But Ebola outbreaks also have all the ingredients for what one psychologist calls the "dread factor."
 
August 22, 2014 | NPR · Census Bureau data show a wider gap between rich and poor. Kelly McEvers explores this with economist Enrico Moretti of the University of California-Berkeley, author of The New Geography of Jobs.
 

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August 22, 2014 | NPR · It's been another rough August for President Obama. He's wrapping up a summer vacation marred by events in Ferguson, Mo., and the murder of an American journalist in the Middle East.
 
August 22, 2014 | NPR · Regular political commentators, E.J. Dionne of The Washington Post and Reihan Salam of The National Review, discuss the killing of American journalist James Foley and the ongoing conflict in Ferguson, Mo.
 
August 22, 2014 | NPR · The scent of fresh pencils is in the air, and homework assignments are around the corner. In honor of back-to-school season, author Alexander Aciman recommends The Lost Estate by Henri Alain-Fournier.
 

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August 23, 2014 | NPR · Nearly 1,500 people have died in the Ebola outbreak, and more nations in the region are closing their borders. NPR's Scott Simon speaks to Africa correspondent Ofeibea Quist-Arcton about the epidemic.
 

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August 17, 2014 | NPR · American fighter jets and drones carried out airstrikes against Islamist targets near the Mosul Dam in northern Iraq on Saturday. A breach of the dam could threaten entire cities.
 

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Earthquakes

Jan 15, 2013 — In fiction, Karen Thompson Walker's sci-fi debut and Vladimir Nabokov's unfinished final novel arrive in paperback. In softcover nonfiction, Toby Wilkinson reviews Egypt's political past; Alec Wilkinson surveys 19th-century polar exploration; and William Broad probes the science of yoga.
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Jul 5, 2012 — Karen Thompson Walker's The Age of Miracles, a fantastical coming-of-age tale, debuts at No. 4.
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Jul 2, 2012 — In Karen Thompson Walker's first book, climate change makes the Earth's rotation grow more and more sluggish, but this melancholy page-turner is more than just a disaster plot.
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Jun 25, 2012 — The 2004 earthquake in Indonesia was so powerful, it sped up Earth's rotation by a fraction of a second each day. That detail inspired Karen Thompson Walker's debut novel, which imagines a world in which Earth has inexplicably begun to slow down, leading to a series of calamitous changes.
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May 24, 2012 — Critic Michael Schaub offers a sneak peek at some of the most hotly anticipated books of the summer: An Obama bio. A sparkling debut. Thrillers of both the fictional and body-science kind. Even Lincoln is reborn in this season of sun, sand, renewal — and reading.
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Jul 14, 2011 — NPR coverage of One Amazing Thing by Chitra Banerjee Divakaruni. News, author interviews, critics' picks and more.
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Sep 9, 2010 — Nine months after the quake in Haiti, Haitian-born author Edwidge Danticat is sharing the earthquake story with an audience that was largely shielded from it — children. Eight Days is a book about a boy who gets buried in the rubble and is not rescued until eight days later.
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Feb 23, 2010 — Reviewer Jane Ciabattari says the new novel by Chitra Banerjee Divakaruni takes the shape of Scheherazade's tales, as nine people begin sharing their life stories after being trapped in the basement passport office of San Fransisco's Indian Consulate after an earthquake.
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Apr 12, 2006 — As San Francisco prepares to mark the centennial of the 1906 earthquake and fire, historians recall how Chinatown, destroyed along with much of the city, almost wasn't rebuilt.
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Oct 10, 2005 — In A Crack in the Edge of The World, author Simon Winchester studies the disaster of the San Francisco earthquake and how it led to Chinese immigration and the rise of the Pentecostal movement.
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