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April 22, 2014 | NPR · A key part of that strategy is the Trans Pacific Partnership — a free trade agreement among 12 Asian-Pacific nations. The trade pact would influence geopolitics and the reshape global trade.
 
April 22, 2014 | NPR · Tuesday marks one month since a hillside gave way and wiped out a rural neighborhood. Crews have been looking for victims' remains ever since. On Monday, the official death toll increased by 2 to 41.
 
April 22, 2014 | NPR · The Supreme Court on Tuesday hears arguments in two high-profile cases that could affect video sharing on the Internet, and the telling of untruths in the political marketplace.
 

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April 22, 2014 | NPR · Washington Gov. Jay Inslee offers an update on the deadly mudslides near the town of Oso in March. President Obama is visiting Oso on Tuesday.
 
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April 22, 2014 | NPR · The Army plans to take all Apache attack helicopters from the National Guard. The Guard says that's an insult, but Army leaders say it's not personal — it's just about saving money.
 
April 22, 2014 | NPR · The White House named Neil Eggleston its new top lawyer. He'll have to muster his legal and political skills to deal with a divided Congress and multiple investigations of the Obama's administration.
 

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April 19, 2014 | NPR · The search continues for hundreds of people, mostly students, who were on board a South Korean ferry when it sank this week. Correspondent Anthony Kuhn shares the latest with NPR's Wade Goodwyn.
 

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April 20, 2014 | NPR · Monday is the 2014 Boston Marathon. Security will be tight, and this year's race will be an emotional event that will be about more than who wins.
 

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Health care reform

Jul 11, 2013 — As we prepare for key provisions of the act to take effect, debate over what the law means persists. Wendell Potter, a former health insurance executive and current senior policy analyst for the Center for Public Integrity, explains what will change, what will remain the same, and why he supports ObamaCare.
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Sep 9, 2010 — As summer ends, it's time for brainy reads you may have missed in hardcover. Wolf Hall, set in the court of Henry VIII, won the 2009 Booker Prize. Former nun Karen Armstrong takes on the atheists in The Case for God. Barbara Ehrenreich pops the bubble of American optimism with her usual wit — and more.
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Dec 29, 2009 — If these books prove anything, it's that the legacy of nonfiction storytelling is still very much alive. Steve Weinberg's picks reflect the depth and diversity of the 2009 current affairs library, ranging from investigations of the role of women in America to a look at what it means to sit supreme on the highest court in the U.S.
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Dec 29, 2009 — In his health care expose, T.R. Reid, a reporter for the Washington Post, reveals numerous opponents of American health care reform as liars, or at best, ill-informed. Reid discusses the benefits of overseas health care programs and tries to dispel the fearful myth of "socialized health care."
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May 11, 2009 — Everyone agrees about the need for health care reform. Management and labor. Insurers and health care providers. Everyone is at the table. So could 2009 be the year we finally reform health care? Commentator Michael Cannon says don't count on it.
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Feb 19, 2009 — Some may say the time for debating Obama's stimulus package has past, that the train has left the station. But the Cato Institute's Michael Cannon wonders whether it actually left the station, or if it's just spinning its wheels.
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Apr 11, 2007 — In Sick: The Untold Story of America's Health Care Crisis — and the People Who Pay the Price, author Jonathan Cohn looks at case studies of patients struggling with the U.S. health-care system to explain why a profit-based model means some people don't get the care they need. Cohn, a senior editor at The New Republic, advocates a government-regulated single-payer system.
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Oct 14, 2004Sammy's Hill, the debut novel of Kristin Gore — daughter of former Vice President Al Gore — has hit bookstore shelves. It's been described as part chick lit and part political commentary. Hear Kristin Gore and NPR's Susan Stamberg.
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