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September 1, 2014 | NPR · A Guinean student in the Senegalese capital of Dakar has tested positive for the deadly disease. David Greene talks to Krista Larson, West Africa correspondent for the Associated Press.
 
September 1, 2014 | NPR · Protesters surrounded Prime Minister Nawaz Sharif's home, and for a brief period forced government TV off the air. Steve Inskeep talks to Jon Boone, a correspondent for The Guardian in Islamabad.
 
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September 1, 2014 | NPR · A widely-watched video shows a foreigner fainting on a subway car and everyone around him fleeing. No one helps. It's sparked a national debate about trust, fear and the Chinese national character.
 

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August 31, 2014 | NPR · On Sunday, Iraqi and Kurdish forces broke a nearly 80-day siege by the Islamic State on the town of Amerli, where residents now have enough food and water for the first time in weeks.
 
August 31, 2014 | NPR · The U.S. military's attention to PTSD is well-documented but Kurdish fighters living with the same disorder haven't received nearly as much care. Arun Rath talks to journalist Jenna Krajeski.
 
August 31, 2014 | NPR · Arun Rath talks to journalist Shane Harris about his Foreign Policy story on "Lady al-Qaida," Aafia Siddiqui. The Pakistani-born woman was arrested in Afghanistan in 2008.
 

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August 30, 2014 | NPR · Ukrainian forces are defending the port city of Novoazovsk from what they say is a Russian invasion. Scott Simon talks to correspondent Soraya Sarhaddi Nelson.
 

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August 31, 2014 | NPR · Immigration remains one of the most challenging issues for President Obama. Political correspondent Mara Liasson discusses the political cost of the choices before him with Linda Wertheimer.
 

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Health care reform

Jul 11, 2013 — As we prepare for key provisions of the act to take effect, debate over what the law means persists. Wendell Potter, a former health insurance executive and current senior policy analyst for the Center for Public Integrity, explains what will change, what will remain the same, and why he supports ObamaCare.
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Sep 9, 2010 — As summer ends, it's time for brainy reads you may have missed in hardcover. Wolf Hall, set in the court of Henry VIII, won the 2009 Booker Prize. Former nun Karen Armstrong takes on the atheists in The Case for God. Barbara Ehrenreich pops the bubble of American optimism with her usual wit — and more.
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Dec 29, 2009 — If these books prove anything, it's that the legacy of nonfiction storytelling is still very much alive. Steve Weinberg's picks reflect the depth and diversity of the 2009 current affairs library, ranging from investigations of the role of women in America to a look at what it means to sit supreme on the highest court in the U.S.
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Dec 29, 2009 — In his health care expose, T.R. Reid, a reporter for the Washington Post, reveals numerous opponents of American health care reform as liars, or at best, ill-informed. Reid discusses the benefits of overseas health care programs and tries to dispel the fearful myth of "socialized health care."
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May 11, 2009 — Everyone agrees about the need for health care reform. Management and labor. Insurers and health care providers. Everyone is at the table. So could 2009 be the year we finally reform health care? Commentator Michael Cannon says don't count on it.
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Feb 19, 2009 — Some may say the time for debating Obama's stimulus package has past, that the train has left the station. But the Cato Institute's Michael Cannon wonders whether it actually left the station, or if it's just spinning its wheels.
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Apr 11, 2007 — In Sick: The Untold Story of America's Health Care Crisis — and the People Who Pay the Price, author Jonathan Cohn looks at case studies of patients struggling with the U.S. health-care system to explain why a profit-based model means some people don't get the care they need. Cohn, a senior editor at The New Republic, advocates a government-regulated single-payer system.
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Oct 14, 2004Sammy's Hill, the debut novel of Kristin Gore — daughter of former Vice President Al Gore — has hit bookstore shelves. It's been described as part chick lit and part political commentary. Hear Kristin Gore and NPR's Susan Stamberg.
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