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August 1, 2014 | NPR · Renee Montagne talks with the head of the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, Dr. Thomas Frieden, for the latest news about the Ebola outbreak in West Africa.
 
August 1, 2014 | NPR · CIA director John Brennan apologized to Sen. Dianne Feinstein, who had accused the CIA of spying on her committee's computers. Brennan at first denied it.
 
August 1, 2014 | NPR · It's one of the most popular items, but often it seems to be as far as humanly possible from the entrance. The Planet Money team looks at two very different theories about why that is.
 

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July 31, 2014 | NPR · The day began with Israel's military calling up 16,000 more reservists, stoking fears of a widening offensive in Gaza; it ended with a 72-hour cease-fire agreement between Israel and Hamas.
 
July 31, 2014 | NPR · Nearly a month into the war in Gaza, pollsters have been taking a look at how attitudes in the region have changed among Israelis and Palestinians.
 
July 31, 2014 | NPR · A surge of new cases in West Africa's Ebola virus outbreak has health officials worried that the epidemic is getting worse. Sierra Leone, for one, has declared a state of emergency, sending in troops to quarantine some of the hardest hit communities.
 

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July 26, 2014 | NPR · Hezbollah has been a longtime ally of Hamas, but during this most recent conflict between Israel and Gaza they've taken a sideline role. NPR's Scott Simon talks to the BBC's Kim Ghattas in Beirut.
 

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July 27, 2014 | NPR · Fighting in Ukraine near the crash site of Malaysia Airlines Flight MH17 has international investigators staying away. NPR's Arun Rath talks with OSCE's Michael Bociurkiw about the investigation.
 

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Underground movements

Jul 22, 2014 — Arthur Allen's new book, The Fantastic Laboratory of Dr. Weigl, describes how a WWII scientist in Poland smuggled the typhus vaccine to Jews — while his team made a weakened version for the Nazis.
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Jul 22, 2013 — In softcover fiction, Laurent Binet plots an escape from Nazi-occupied Czechoslovakia and Hanna Pylvainen explores the fundamentalist religion of her youth. In nonfiction, Seth Rosenfeld explains the FBI's involvement with the 1964 University of California, Berkeley, student protest movement.
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Jun 23, 2012 — These five books will give you literary jet lag — a yearning to linger in the world of the author's imagination, and a reluctance to return to your own. The research is so deep it becomes invisible, and these writers are trusted guides, gently nudging and leading you through each tale.
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Jul 14, 2011 — NPR coverage of Spies of the Balkans by Alan Furst. News, author interviews, critics' picks and more.
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Jun 16, 2011 — Jane Smiley, Carl Hiaasen, James Lee Burke and Alan Furst all return with novels in which the characters gradually awaken to the toxicity of their choices, while in nonfiction, Sonia Shah looks at how malaria has ruled humankind for 500,000 years.
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Aug 9, 2010 — Author Jake Halpern is all about mood. When he's looking to deluge his senses, he turns to Night Soldiers. Whether ambling down Parisian streets on the eve of war or taking a crisp train ride through the Pyrenees, Alan Furst's prose takes him instantly there.
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Jun 15, 2010 — Alan Furst's latest World War II thriller is packed with convincing details and heart-pounding plot. Furst draws readers into the world of a Macedonian police detective seized by a conviction to undermine the coming Nazi rule by helping one Jewish fugitive at a time.
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Jul 22, 2008 — Lt. Col. John Nagl wrote the textbook on counterinsurgency — literally. Nagl was part of the team that drafted a U.S. Army field manual on counterinsurgency. Having completed his tour in Iraq, Nagl talks about how military theory was put into practice in the region.
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Feb 21, 2008 — Last year, 13 percent of junior officers with four to nine years experience left the armed services, a jump from eight percent in 2003. Marine Corps Times reporter Andrew Tilghman joins Talk of the Nation to discuss what this loss of experienced soldiers could mean for the military.
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Jan 11, 2006 — In October 2003, Mark Etherington became governor of the Shiite-majority Wasit Province in Iraq. Six months later, Etherington, isolated from the Coalition Provisional Authority in Baghdad, was forced to flee his headquarters in al-Kut, the province's capital. His new book is Revolt on the Tigris.
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