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August 20, 2014 | NPR · If you venture away from the protest zone in Ferguson, Mo., there is an idyllic neighborhood, which doesn't have much patience for the out-of-towners who have joined the protests.
 
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August 20, 2014 | NPR · President Obama has carefully avoided taking sides following the shooting of Missouri teen Michael Brown, disappointing some African-American observers.
 
August 20, 2014 | NPR · Texas ranks 49th out of 50 states in how much funding it commits to mental health. But San Antonio has become a model for other mental health systems. It has saved $50 million over the past 5 years.
 

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August 19, 2014 | NPR · Dr. Joanne Liu of Doctors Without Borders says fear and a lack of sense of urgency has kept the international community in their home countries rather than stepping up to the plate in West Africa.
 
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August 19, 2014 | NPR · The type of Ebola erupting in West Africa is closely related to one found 2,500 miles away — the distance between Boston and San Francisco. How did the virus spread so far without anyone noticing?
 
August 19, 2014 | NPR · Iranian poet and women's rights advocate Simin Behbahani has died. Her work probed the social and political challenges that faced Iran after its Islamic Revolution. She was 87.
 

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August 16, 2014 | NPR · Both Ukraine and Russia say they're trying to send supplies to residents in eastern Ukraine. But with tensions on both sides running high, that aid may take a while to arrive.
 

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August 17, 2014 | NPR · American fighter jets and drones carried out airstrikes against Islamist targets near the Mosul Dam in northern Iraq on Saturday. A breach of the dam could threaten entire cities.
 

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Underground movements

Jul 22, 2014 — Arthur Allen's new book, The Fantastic Laboratory of Dr. Weigl, describes how a WWII scientist in Poland smuggled the typhus vaccine to Jews — while his team made a weakened version for the Nazis.
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Jul 22, 2013 — In softcover fiction, Laurent Binet plots an escape from Nazi-occupied Czechoslovakia and Hanna Pylvainen explores the fundamentalist religion of her youth. In nonfiction, Seth Rosenfeld explains the FBI's involvement with the 1964 University of California, Berkeley, student protest movement.
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Jun 23, 2012 — These five books will give you literary jet lag — a yearning to linger in the world of the author's imagination, and a reluctance to return to your own. The research is so deep it becomes invisible, and these writers are trusted guides, gently nudging and leading you through each tale.
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Jul 14, 2011 — NPR coverage of Spies of the Balkans by Alan Furst. News, author interviews, critics' picks and more.
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Jun 16, 2011 — Jane Smiley, Carl Hiaasen, James Lee Burke and Alan Furst all return with novels in which the characters gradually awaken to the toxicity of their choices, while in nonfiction, Sonia Shah looks at how malaria has ruled humankind for 500,000 years.
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Aug 9, 2010 — Author Jake Halpern is all about mood. When he's looking to deluge his senses, he turns to Night Soldiers. Whether ambling down Parisian streets on the eve of war or taking a crisp train ride through the Pyrenees, Alan Furst's prose takes him instantly there.
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Jun 15, 2010 — Alan Furst's latest World War II thriller is packed with convincing details and heart-pounding plot. Furst draws readers into the world of a Macedonian police detective seized by a conviction to undermine the coming Nazi rule by helping one Jewish fugitive at a time.
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Jul 22, 2008 — Lt. Col. John Nagl wrote the textbook on counterinsurgency — literally. Nagl was part of the team that drafted a U.S. Army field manual on counterinsurgency. Having completed his tour in Iraq, Nagl talks about how military theory was put into practice in the region.
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Feb 21, 2008 — Last year, 13 percent of junior officers with four to nine years experience left the armed services, a jump from eight percent in 2003. Marine Corps Times reporter Andrew Tilghman joins Talk of the Nation to discuss what this loss of experienced soldiers could mean for the military.
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Jan 11, 2006 — In October 2003, Mark Etherington became governor of the Shiite-majority Wasit Province in Iraq. Six months later, Etherington, isolated from the Coalition Provisional Authority in Baghdad, was forced to flee his headquarters in al-Kut, the province's capital. His new book is Revolt on the Tigris.
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