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September 2, 2014 | NPR · At a Labor Day picnic in Milwaukee, the president accused the GOP of blocking economic initiatives. He urged the sympathetic union audience to turn their frustration into political action in November.
 
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September 2, 2014 | NPR · The city's plan to restructure its debt has been praised as a creative way to protect both pensioners and its art museum. But some creditors — and residents — feel like they're being railroaded.
 
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September 2, 2014 | NPR · A company called WTAS is reviving the defunct accounting firm's name and hoping clients have forgotten its associations with the Enron scandal.
 

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September 1, 2014 | NPR · Ebola has exposed weaknesses in Africa's health networks and a failure to work together to arrest the spread of the virus. The "not our problem" response is taking an economic toll on the continent.
 
September 1, 2014 | NPR · Nearly 260 health workers in West Africa have been infected, and 134 have died. Dr. Robert Garry of Tulane University, who worked with five who died, discusses the devastation in the community.
 
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September 1, 2014 | NPR · Ads with candidates shooting guns are proliferating this year. It can all be traced back to Sen. Joe Manchin's famed 2010 spot "Dead Aim."
 

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August 30, 2014 | NPR · Ukrainian forces are defending the port city of Novoazovsk from what they say is a Russian invasion. Scott Simon talks to correspondent Soraya Sarhaddi Nelson.
 

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August 31, 2014 | NPR · Immigration remains one of the most challenging issues for President Obama. Political correspondent Mara Liasson discusses the political cost of the choices before him with Linda Wertheimer.
 

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Southwest, New

Aug 11, 2011 — More than 5,000 of you nominated. More than 60,000 of you voted. And now the results are in. Explore the winners of NPR's Top 100 Science-Fiction and Fantasy survey — an intriguing mix of classic and contemporary titles.
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Aug 8, 2011 — NPR coverage of A Canticle for Leibowitz by Walter M. Miller Jr. News, author interviews, critics' picks and more.
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Jul 25, 2011 — NPR coverage of Finding Everett Ruess: The Life and Unsolved Disappearance of a Legendary Wilderness Explorer by David Roberts. News, author interviews, critics' picks and more.
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Jul 25, 2011 — Everett Ruess could have been one of this country's great wilderness writers, but he was only 20 when he vanished without a trace in the remote Utah wilderness. Author David Roberts' new book traces Ruess' life and the mystery that grew up around his disappearance in 1934.
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Jul 20, 2011 — Novelist and TV producer Kathy Reichs returns with her latest crime adventure, journalist Judy Pasternak uncovers environmental injustice on the Navajo reservation, biographer Justin Spring explores the life of a sexual renegade, and marketing expert Paco Underhill explains the "science of female shopping."
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Jul 8, 2009 — Two collectors from Utah pleaded guilty this week in the government's crackdown on the looting and trafficking of ancient Native American artifacts. That's a rare success for prosecutors in the decades-long effort to curb an artifacts black market in the Four Corners states.
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Jul 1, 2009 — It took two years and more than $300,000 before federal agents could arrest 17 people in Blanding, Utah, for selling ancient American Indian artifacts on the black market. Locals are upset about the way in which the shouting, gun-wielding agents arrested the suspects.
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Nov 21, 2007 — Every meal has to end with dessert, and a special Thanksgiving feast is no exception. Native American chef Walter Whitewater shares his recipe for Pinyon Chocolate Torte.
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Aug 13, 2006 — Feelance writer Philip Connors doubles as a fire lookout in the Gila National Forest in New Mexico. The job lasts six months a year, and gives him a chance to peruse a fair amount of literature. He offers a few recommendations, including the novel Homeland, a series of updates provided to a high school alum newsletter and one of "the funniest things" he's ever read.
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