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July 30, 2014 | KQED · Adding a translation to the English label would require bigger bottles, pharmacists say. They worry patients would wind up carrying a few pills around loose — without any instructions at all.
 
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July 30, 2014 | WNYC · In the last 20 years, New Jersey went from having more than 20 percent of U.S. pharmaceutical manufacturing jobs to less than 10 percent. That means offices, labs and warehouses have gone dark.
 
July 30, 2014 | NPR · Sheik Humarr Khan, one of the doctors fighting to control West Africa's largest Ebola outbreak, died Tuesday in Sierra Leone. He was 39.
 

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July 29, 2014 | KERA · After caring for Ebola patients for several months in West Africa, Dr. Kent Brantly noticed last week that he had symptoms. The 33-year-old immediately put himself into a Liberian isolation ward.
 
July 29, 2014 | NPR · Virologist Thomas Geisbert has spent decades studying Ebola and other hemorrhagic fevers. He speaks to Audie Cornish about the current Ebola outbreak, the worst in history, and how it might be contained this time around.
 
July 29, 2014 | NPR · The Eid festival, which celebrates the end of Ramadan, serves as a time for visiting relatives and exchanging gifts. But one family's holiday in Gaza traces the death and displacement wrought by the war between Hamas and Israel.
 

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July 26, 2014 | NPR · Hezbollah has been a longtime ally of Hamas, but during this most recent conflict between Israel and Gaza they've taken a sideline role. NPR's Scott Simon talks to the BBC's Kim Ghattas in Beirut.
 

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July 27, 2014 | NPR · Fighting in Ukraine near the crash site of Malaysia Airlines Flight MH17 has international investigators staying away. NPR's Arun Rath talks with OSCE's Michael Bociurkiw about the investigation.
 

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Japanese Americans

Jun 17, 2014 — If books float your boat, we've got just the thing: magical barge battles, the search for the Northwest Passage and a trans-Atlantic cruise that follows in Geoffrey Chaucer's footsteps. Also pirates!
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Jun 5, 2014 — The NPR education team brings you 25 books with minority characters and authors.
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Nov 20, 2013 — On Tuesday night, finalists for the National Book Awards read from their nominated works at The New School in New York City. The National Book Foundation will announce the winners Wednesday night.
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Aug 18, 2013 — Every new generation of immigrants must meet the age-old challenges of building a new home — assimilation and conformity, old habits and new cultures, adjustment and isolation. Author Helene Wecker shares with us three books that explore the complexities of life on foreign shores.
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Aug 14, 2012 — Bill Manbo, an auto mechanic from Riverside, Calif., took photos of life inside a Japanese-American internment camp after he and his family were forced to move to Wyoming during World War II. These rare color photographs are now compiled in a new book called Colors of Confinement.
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Sep 30, 2011 — The Chinese-American tale Hotel on the Corner of Bitter and Sweet is on the list for an 85th week.
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Jul 17, 2011 — NPR coverage of Oh!: A Mystery of "Mono No Aware" by Todd Shimoda and L. J. C. Shimoda. News, author interviews, critics' picks and more.
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Aug 12, 2010 — The protagonist of Naomi Hirahara's novels isn't a seasoned police detective or a private investigator — he's a gruff, 72-year-old gardener who lives in the hills above Pasadena, Calif. The Mas Arai character was inspired by Hirahara's father and guides readers into the hidden corners of L.A.'s Japanese-American communities.
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May 12, 2010 — After the Pearl Harbor attack in 1941, the U.S. government relocated 120,000 people of Japanese ancestry from their homes on the West Coast to desolate inland areas of the U.S. The Art of Gaman is a new exhibit that showcases works of art created by internees during this dark chapter of U.S. history.
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Oct 20, 2009 — Author Lisa See is drawn to books by Japanese-American women and the issues they tend to write about: love, race, identity, place and history — and its effect on the present.
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