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August 28, 2014 | NPR · For the first time, researchers have tracked the spread of Ebola, almost in real time, during an outbreak. The virus is quickly changing its genetic code. But it's unclear what the mutations mean.
 
August 29, 2014 | NPR · French President Francois Hollande is under pressure to fix the country's economy, which is overburdened by regulation and failing a generation of young people. He's also facing calls for austerity.
 
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August 29, 2014 | NPR · Congressman and former Republican vice presidential nominee Paul Ryan discusses his new book, The Way Forward: Renewing the American Idea.
 

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August 30, 2014 | NPR · In Ukraine, worried officials in the southeastern part of the country beefed up their defenses on Saturday as rebel forces slowly moved west following the recent capture of a strategic seaside town.
 
August 30, 2014 | NPR · Arun Rath talks to former U.S. Ambassador to Ukraine Steven Pifer about NATO and EU options for confronting Russian aggression in Ukraine.
 
August 30, 2014 | NPR · More than 500 people may have traveled from the U.K. to Syria to fight in its civil war. Arun Rath talks to Jessica Stern, author of Terror In The Name Of God, about how it's drawing Westerners.
 

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August 30, 2014 | NPR · Ukrainian forces are defending the port city of Novoazovsk from what they say is a Russian invasion. Scott Simon talks to correspondent Soraya Sarhaddi Nelson.
 

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August 24, 2014 | NPR · In the wake of violent clashes between protesters and police in Ferguson, Mo., President Obama is ordering a review of the federal programs that help local police departments purchase military gear.
 

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Japanese Americans

Jun 17, 2014 — If books float your boat, we've got just the thing: magical barge battles, the search for the Northwest Passage and a trans-Atlantic cruise that follows in Geoffrey Chaucer's footsteps. Also pirates!
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Jun 5, 2014 — The NPR education team brings you 25 books with minority characters and authors.
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Nov 20, 2013 — On Tuesday night, finalists for the National Book Awards read from their nominated works at The New School in New York City. The National Book Foundation will announce the winners Wednesday night.
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Aug 18, 2013 — Every new generation of immigrants must meet the age-old challenges of building a new home — assimilation and conformity, old habits and new cultures, adjustment and isolation. Author Helene Wecker shares with us three books that explore the complexities of life on foreign shores.
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Aug 14, 2012 — Bill Manbo, an auto mechanic from Riverside, Calif., took photos of life inside a Japanese-American internment camp after he and his family were forced to move to Wyoming during World War II. These rare color photographs are now compiled in a new book called Colors of Confinement.
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Sep 30, 2011 — The Chinese-American tale Hotel on the Corner of Bitter and Sweet is on the list for an 85th week.
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Jul 17, 2011 — NPR coverage of Oh!: A Mystery of "Mono No Aware" by Todd Shimoda and L. J. C. Shimoda. News, author interviews, critics' picks and more.
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Aug 12, 2010 — The protagonist of Naomi Hirahara's novels isn't a seasoned police detective or a private investigator — he's a gruff, 72-year-old gardener who lives in the hills above Pasadena, Calif. The Mas Arai character was inspired by Hirahara's father and guides readers into the hidden corners of L.A.'s Japanese-American communities.
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May 12, 2010 — After the Pearl Harbor attack in 1941, the U.S. government relocated 120,000 people of Japanese ancestry from their homes on the West Coast to desolate inland areas of the U.S. The Art of Gaman is a new exhibit that showcases works of art created by internees during this dark chapter of U.S. history.
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Oct 20, 2009 — Author Lisa See is drawn to books by Japanese-American women and the issues they tend to write about: love, race, identity, place and history — and its effect on the present.
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