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July 23, 2014 | NPR · A number of major airlines have suspended service to and from Tel Aviv as the fighting between Israel and Hamas in Gaza intensifies. That's leaving passengers to find other arrangements.
 
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July 23, 2014 | NPR · The vice president has been traveling the country to learn about the best ways to train workers. He announced the results Tuesday as the president signed a workforce training bill into law.
 
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July 23, 2014 | NPR · Congress is supposed to hold U.S. spy agencies accountable. But as Edward Snowden's disclosures revealed, intelligence officials have not always provided a full or accurate picture.
 

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July 22, 2014 | NPR · Two weeks into the conflict in the Gaza Strip, more than 600 Palestinians — mostly civilians — and 29 Israelis have been killed. Two recent Israeli strikes, on a school and a hospital, reflect the scope of Israel's offensive.
 
July 22, 2014 | NPR · U.S. airlines have canceled flights to Israel after reports of Hamas rockets landing near Ben Gurion International Airport outside Tel Aviv.
 
July 22, 2014 | NPR · Secretary of State John Kerry has finished his first full day in Cairo, where he's trying to help forge a cease-fire between Israel and Hamas in the Gaza Strip.
 

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July 19, 2014 | NPR · NPR's Scott Simon talks with David Herzsenhorn of The New York Times about the latest developments in Ukraine, where a Malaysia Airlines passenger plane was downed on Thursday, killing 298 people.
 

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July 20, 2014 | NPR · NPR's Arun Rath gets the latest from correspondent Corey Flintoff at the site of last week's downing of a Malaysian jetliner in Eastern Ukraine.
 

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San Francisco (Calif.)

Dec 4, 2013 — NPR staff and critics selected more than 200 standout titles. Now it's up to you: Choose your own adventure! Use our tags to search through books and find the perfect read for yourself or someone else.
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Jul 2, 2013 — This is the second mystery in Sara Gran's series featuring 40-ish bad-girl detective Claire DeWitt. Critic Maureen Corrigan says that reading a noir novel written by a Brooklyn-born author gave her a rush of private-eye, patriotic pride.
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Jun 30, 2013 — Novels dealing in privacy-free futures aren't new. But they're rapidly becoming more relevant. Author Max Barry chooses three dystopian novels that are both thought-provoking and chillingly plausible. What's your favorite futuristic novel? Tell us in the comments.
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Feb 15, 2013 — An orphan overcomes her past in Vanessa Diffenbaugh's The Language Of Flowers. It rises to No. 4.
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Dec 24, 2012 — Four novels for the year's end: a new Raylan Givens adventure from Elmore Leonard, a story of psychology and obsession from Ellen Ullman, Thomas Caplan's latest spy thriller and Alex Gilvarry's debut set in the fashion world and Guantanamo Bay.
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Apr 12, 2012 — In The Language of Flowers, an orphan discovers she can communicate with nature. It debuts at No. 7.
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Apr 4, 2012 — Novelist Julie Otsuka returns with a tale of Japanese "picture brides" in the U.S., while Kyung-sook Shin explores the life of a Korean mother. Plus singer Shania Twain's account of overcoming poverty and divorce to hold her own as a country music star, actress Shirley MacLaine's ruminations on politics and life, and writer Wendy McClure's immersion in the life of Laura Ingalls Wilder.
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Mar 29, 2012 — The lives of six Japanese-Americans unfold in The Buddha in the Attic, which debuts at No. 5.
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Feb 28, 2012 — A disgraced literature professor in 1970s San Francisco listens in on a lesbian's therapy sessions in Ellen Ullman's psychologically labyrinthine and darkly irresistible new novel.
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Feb 24, 2012 — Science fiction's job is to give us a map of where we're headed. From Jules Verne to William Gibson, sci-fi authors describe their visions of the future, and how people might live in it. We ask Intel's futurist for his list of favorite sci-fi books.
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