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April 23, 2014 | NPR · They say they were placed on the list for refusing to inform on other Muslims. The suit is part of a broad wave of cases challenging the secretive no-fly list and U.S. counterterrorism strategies.
 
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April 23, 2014 | NPR · Activists say a federal law that allows employers to pay people with disabilities pennies per hour is out of date and should be changed. But some say the law is a lifeline for the disabled.
 
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April 23, 2014 | NPR · Shakespeare's Globe Theater aims to take the Bard's iconic play to every country in the world. It will perform everywhere from prestigious theaters to Pacific island beaches.
 

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April 21, 2014 | NPR · Last year a scientist said he'd found a new form of botulinum toxin, and was keeping details secret to keep the recipe from terrorists. But other science and public health labs were shut out, too.
 
April 23, 2014 | NPR · Pharmaceutical companies are suddenly trading entire divisions the way sports teams swap players. Glaxo, Novartis and Ely Lily are all involved in a complicated deal announced Tuesday, and so far this year, five deals exceeding $2 billion have been announced. What's driving the deal-making?
 
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April 23, 2014 | NPR · For decades, a mysterious quacking "bio-duck" has been heard roaming the waters of the Southern Ocean. Now scientists say the source is a whale.
 

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April 19, 2014 | NPR · The search continues for hundreds of people, mostly students, who were on board a South Korean ferry when it sank this week. Correspondent Anthony Kuhn shares the latest with NPR's Wade Goodwyn.
 

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April 20, 2014 | NPR · Monday is the 2014 Boston Marathon. Security will be tight, and this year's race will be an emotional event that will be about more than who wins.
 

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San Francisco (Calif.)

Dec 4, 2013 — NPR staff and critics selected more than 200 standout titles. Now it's up to you: Choose your own adventure! Use our tags to search through books and find the perfect read for yourself or someone else.
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Jul 2, 2013 — This is the second mystery in Sara Gran's series featuring 40-ish bad-girl detective Claire DeWitt. Critic Maureen Corrigan says that reading a noir novel written by a Brooklyn-born author gave her a rush of private-eye, patriotic pride.
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Jun 30, 2013 — Novels dealing in privacy-free futures aren't new. But they're rapidly becoming more relevant. Author Max Barry chooses three dystopian novels that are both thought-provoking and chillingly plausible. What's your favorite futuristic novel? Tell us in the comments.
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Feb 15, 2013 — An orphan overcomes her past in Vanessa Diffenbaugh's The Language Of Flowers. It rises to No. 4.
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Dec 24, 2012 — Four novels for the year's end: a new Raylan Givens adventure from Elmore Leonard, a story of psychology and obsession from Ellen Ullman, Thomas Caplan's latest spy thriller and Alex Gilvarry's debut set in the fashion world and Guantanamo Bay.
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Apr 12, 2012 — In The Language of Flowers, an orphan discovers she can communicate with nature. It debuts at No. 7.
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Apr 4, 2012 — Novelist Julie Otsuka returns with a tale of Japanese "picture brides" in the U.S., while Kyung-sook Shin explores the life of a Korean mother. Plus singer Shania Twain's account of overcoming poverty and divorce to hold her own as a country music star, actress Shirley MacLaine's ruminations on politics and life, and writer Wendy McClure's immersion in the life of Laura Ingalls Wilder.
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Mar 29, 2012 — The lives of six Japanese-Americans unfold in The Buddha in the Attic, which debuts at No. 5.
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Feb 28, 2012 — A disgraced literature professor in 1970s San Francisco listens in on a lesbian's therapy sessions in Ellen Ullman's psychologically labyrinthine and darkly irresistible new novel.
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Feb 24, 2012 — Science fiction's job is to give us a map of where we're headed. From Jules Verne to William Gibson, sci-fi authors describe their visions of the future, and how people might live in it. We ask Intel's futurist for his list of favorite sci-fi books.
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