Latest News from NPR

on:

NCPR is supported by:

 
Hourly Newscast
4 min., 45 sec.

Programs

Latest program rundown

Coming up:

Latest Features:
July 29, 2014 | NPR · House and Senate negotiators reached a compromise, $17 billion agreement to improve medical care for veterans. The deal comes in the final week before Congress leaves town for a monthlong recess.
 
July 29, 2014 | NPR · Washington Post reporter Liz Sly tells Renee Montagne that U.S. arms may be flowing to moderate Syrian rebels, but the aid seems to be too little too late to affect the course of the civil war.
 
AFP/Getty Images
July 28, 2014 | NPR · The militant group threatens to kill parents who immunize their children. As a result, polio has come roaring back in Pakistan. Eradication now hinges on whether the country can control the virus.
 

Latest program rundown

Coming up:

Latest Features:
July 28, 2014 | NPR · A new salvo has been fired in the fight over teacher tenure. A group led by former TV anchor Campbell Brown filed a complaint in New York state court, arguing that tenure laws are preventing the state from providing every child with the "sound, basic education" its constitution guarantees.
 
WNYC
July 28, 2014 | NPR · Why are so many low-income and minority kids getting second-class educations in the U.S.? That question is at the center of the heated debate about tenure protections and who gets them.
 
July 28, 2014 | NPR · Only one movie in July, Transformers: Age of Extinction, has broken the 100 million mark during its opening weekend. Box office receipts all summer have proven anemic. Paul Dergarabedian, a senior media analyst with RENTRAK, talks to Audie Cornish about the box office slump.
 

Latest Saturday rundown




WE Saturday Feature

July 26, 2014 | NPR · Hezbollah has been a longtime ally of Hamas, but during this most recent conflict between Israel and Gaza they've taken a sideline role. NPR's Scott Simon talks to the BBC's Kim Ghattas in Beirut.
 

Latest Sunday rundown


WE Sunday Feature

July 27, 2014 | NPR · Fighting in Ukraine near the crash site of Malaysia Airlines Flight MH17 has international investigators staying away. NPR's Arun Rath talks with OSCE's Michael Bociurkiw about the investigation.
 

Latest program rundown

Coming up:

Evolution

Mar 8, 2013 — It's already happened. We humans have already met an intelligent alien. Not only that, we almost certainly had sex with them. And we did here, right here on Earth, not so many generations ago.
Comments |
Jan 1, 2013 — The discovery of the Higgs boson will likely be hailed as the most important scientific discovery of 2012. But many ideas that change the world don't tend to spring from flashy moments of discovery. Our view of nature — and our technology — often evolve from a sequence of more subtle advances.
Launch in player | Comments |
May 13, 2012 — Ecologist and "natural security expert" Rafe Sagarin thinks our systems for dealing with natural disasters and terrorist attacks need to be updated. The best place to turn for advice? Other organisms.
Launch in player | Comments |
Mar 14, 2012 — Novelists Patricia Marx and Meg Wolitzer take a fresh look at romance, while Samuel Park explores how its fallout leads to an unlikely immigration trajectory for his Korean heroine. In nonfiction, James Gleick explores information theory, Antonio Damasio rethinks consciousness, and Joshua Foer investigates the nature of memory.
Comments |
Nov 8, 2011 — Naturalist Mark Derr says our friendship with dogs and wolves goes back thousands of years more than previously believed. His new book explores how the relationship between humans and wolves developed.
Launch in player | Comments |
Jun 6, 2008 — Futurist Ray Kurzweil explains the idea of the "singularity" — what happens when technology advances so much that it's impossible to predict what happens next. Will artificial intelligence, nanotechnology, and biotechnology be able to completely reshape what it means to be human?
Launch in player | Comments |
Aug 10, 2007 — Is evolution for everyone? Dr. David Sloan Wilson of Binghamton University argues that science and religion can coexist peacefully. His book strives "to harmonize evolution and religion in a noncontroversial manner."
Launch in player | Comments |
Jun 25, 2007 — Author Deirdre Barrett talks about her book, Waistland: A (R)evolutionary View of Our Weight and Fitness Crisis. She explains how farming ruined our figures and our health. Barrett also offers advice on how to lose weight: eat less and exercise more.
Launch in player | Comments |
Aug 8, 2005 — Catholic author George Sim Johnston writes that the Catholic Church has no problem with evolutionary theory or the idea that the first humans had biological antecedents — so long as divine causality is not kept out of the big picture.
Comments |
Jul 12, 2005 — A recent opinion column in The New York Times by Cardinal Schonborn, the influential archbishop of Vienna, denounced evolution as "an unguided, unplanned process." The column is a departure from the Catholic Church's more ambivilent stance on evolution. Madeleine Brand discusses Schonborn's comments with John Haught, professor of theology at Georgetown University and author of God After Darwin: A Theology of Evolution.
Launch in player | Comments |
more Evolution from NPR