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April 16, 2014 | NPR · Schoolgirls were kidnapped in Nigeria Tuesday. The suspects are believed to be with a radical group blamed for a bombing Monday. Kelly McEvers talks to Michelle Faul of The Associated Press.
 
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April 16, 2014 | NPR · Fans and foes want to know whether the Affordable Care Act is meeting its goals. But, for good reasons, there are no clear answers yet.
 
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April 16, 2014 | NPR · A year after the Boston Marathon bombing, Heather Abbott has adapted to life with her prostheses, including a blade for running and one that allows her to wear her favorite shoes.
 

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April 16, 2014 | NPR · Ukrainian tanks arrived in the city of Kramatorsk Wednesday morning. By the time they rolled out of the city, they were flying Russian flags. People in Kramatorsk tell the story of what happened.
 
April 16, 2014 | NPR · NATO has announced a strengthening of its forces near the alliance's eastern border. Gen. George Joulwan, the former NATO supreme allied commander for Europe, discusses the plan.
 
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April 16, 2014 | NPR · A 325 million-year-old fossil find shows that the gill structures of modern sharks are actually quite different from their ancient ancestors.
 

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April 12, 2014 | NPR · As pro-Russia demonstrators continue their tense standoff in Eastern Ukraine, police are conspicuously absent from city streets.
 

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April 13, 2014 | NPR · As the anniversary of last year's marathon bombing approaches, NPR's Rachel Martin speaks with correspondent Carrie Johnson about the investigation and legal wrangling yet to come.
 

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Effect of human beings on

Dec 10, 2013 — Whatever happened on Easter Island, it wasn't good. Polynesians landed there, farmed, thrived, built their famous statues, and then things went very bad, very fast. Sixteen million trees vanished. What happened? Was this a case of ecological collapse? Not exactly, say two anthropologists. It was, arguably, worse than that.
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Dec 6, 2013 — When bees disappeared from central China years ago, Chinese apple farmers had to pollinate by hand. Embarrassing — people doing bees' work, but then came the big discovery — a surprise that still haunts the conservation movement. What if people outperform bees?
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Sep 17, 2013 — Two short tales: One about bad guys in a fishing village in Pakistan, the other about good guys in Baghdad. And the question is posed: in the long arc of time, which side prevails, those with the impulse to take or those with the impulse to give?
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Jul 17, 2011 — NPR coverage of Natives And Exotics by Jane Alison. News, author interviews, critics' picks and more.
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Jul 15, 2011 — NPR coverage of More: Population, Nature, and What Women Want by Robert Engelman. News, author interviews, critics' picks and more.
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Jul 26, 2009 — Our search for the most fascinating new science books finds true tales of Aztec super-athletes, criminal butterfly collectors, Isaac Newton's unknown detective career and the mysteries of the human stomach and brain.
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May 11, 2009 — Journalist and author Peter Laufer uncovered The Dangerous World of Butterflies for his new book. He discusses the history of criminality and intrigue that surrounds conservationists and collectors of a icon of innocence.
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May 11, 2009 — No one knows how monarchs do it, but these butterflies migrate from far north, sometimes even from Canada, to spend their winters in Michoacan, Mexico.
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May 30, 2008 — How do population, natural resources and women's rights all intersect? Author Robert Engelman explains in a new book how allowing women to control their reproduction can lead to a more sustainable planet
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Nov 16, 2007 — In his new book, Terra, fossil hunter Michael Novacek writes that Earth is overburdened and that the planet faces a mass extinction. Novacek, a paleontologist and curator at the American Museum of Natural History, discusses the history of ecosystems on Earth, and current risks to the environment.
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