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July 31, 2014 | NPR · Tens of thousands of displaced Gazans face skyrocketing prices for limited water supplies, and severely disrupted electricity service. As well, long lines are developing for staples like bread.
 
July 31, 2014 | NPR · Christian Science Monitor reporter Christa Case Bryant tells Renee Montagne why the Israeli army is finding Hamas a more formidable foe now than during the 2009 war.
 
July 31, 2014 | NPR · Oklahoma is experiencing more earthquakes, and some scientists say they're caused by wastewater disposal wells. Linda Wertheimer learns more from energy reporter Joe Wertz of StateImpact Oklahoma.
 

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July 31, 2014 | NPR · The day began with Israel's military calling up 16,000 more reservists, stoking fears of a widening offensive in Gaza; it ended with a 72-hour cease-fire agreement between Israel and Hamas.
 
July 31, 2014 | NPR · Nearly a month into the war in Gaza, pollsters have been taking a look at how attitudes in the region have changed among Israelis and Palestinians.
 
July 31, 2014 | NPR · A surge of new cases in West Africa's Ebola virus outbreak has health officials worried that the epidemic is getting worse. Sierra Leone, for one, has declared a state of emergency, sending in troops to quarantine some of the hardest hit communities.
 

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July 26, 2014 | NPR · Hezbollah has been a longtime ally of Hamas, but during this most recent conflict between Israel and Gaza they've taken a sideline role. NPR's Scott Simon talks to the BBC's Kim Ghattas in Beirut.
 

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July 27, 2014 | NPR · Fighting in Ukraine near the crash site of Malaysia Airlines Flight MH17 has international investigators staying away. NPR's Arun Rath talks with OSCE's Michael Bociurkiw about the investigation.
 

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Politics and culture

Jun 11, 2012 — Summer is a trying time for introverts, what with the barbecues and the graduations and the picnics by the pool. If you'd always choose a good book over a good party, critic Maureen Corrigan has a list for you.
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Apr 28, 2009 — Public intellectual George Scialabba contemplates the role of great — and not so great — thinkers in his new collection of essays, What Are Intellectuals Good For? Critic Maureen Corrigan calls it "a pleasure to read."
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Jan 24, 2007 — Family members often share values and politics — but not always. For some, the nation's political divide is deeply personal. Brian Mann comes from one such family. He describes how he and his brother have agreed to try to bridge the gap.
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Jun 21, 2006 — British writer Christopher Hitchens was once the literary lion of the left. But after Sept. 11, 2001, he surprised many with his robust support for the Bush administration's war on terrorism. It has cost Hitchens friends and allies, and left others wondering how it happened.
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Oct 11, 2005 — Sergio Luzzatto, author of The Body of Il Duce: Mussolini's Corpse and the Fortunes of Italy, describes how Benito Mussolini's body has been beaten, buried, exhumed, stolen, hidden and turned into a shrine by his followers. He says the struggle over the remains reflects Italy's struggle to become a republic and leave fascism behind.
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Aug 10, 2005 — As next year's mid-term elections approach, the Republican Party is trying to appeal to ever-larger numbers of African Americans. Party leaders believe many black voters side with them on values issues like the state of the family, homosexuality and abortion. Sen. Rick Santorum (R-PA) talks about these and other issues in his new book It Takes a Family: Conservatism and the Common Good.
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Aug 4, 2005 — Sen. Rick Santorum (R-PA) is one of the Republican Party's strongest and most conservative voices. He talks about his new book, It Takes a Family, where he discusses the politics of intelligent design, and what he'd like to hear from Supreme Court nominee John Roberts.
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Dec 14, 2004 — It's not easy to place author and polemicist Christopher Hitchens into a particular ideological camp. The man who accuses former Secretary of State Henry Kissenger of war crimes is himself considered a "hawk" to many on the left. Hitchens joins NPR's Tavis Smiley to discuss his latest book, Love, Poverty and War: Journeys and Essays.
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Oct 27, 2004 — NPR's Karen Grigsby Bates discusses the new book Culture War? The Myth of a Polarized America with its co-author, Samuel Abrams. Abrams argues that the "red vs. blue" cultural divide repeated by American media is inaccurate shorthand, and that Americans agree more than disagree about many important issues.
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