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July 29, 2014 | NPR · House and Senate negotiators reached a compromise, $17 billion agreement to improve medical care for veterans. The deal comes in the final week before Congress leaves town for a monthlong recess.
 
July 29, 2014 | NPR · Washington Post reporter Liz Sly tells Renee Montagne that U.S. arms may be flowing to moderate Syrian rebels, but the aid seems to be too little too late to affect the course of the civil war.
 
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July 28, 2014 | NPR · The militant group threatens to kill parents who immunize their children. As a result, polio has come roaring back in Pakistan. Eradication now hinges on whether the country can control the virus.
 

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July 28, 2014 | NPR · A new salvo has been fired in the fight over teacher tenure. A group led by former TV anchor Campbell Brown filed a complaint in New York state court, arguing that tenure laws are preventing the state from providing every child with the "sound, basic education" its constitution guarantees.
 
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July 28, 2014 | NPR · Why are so many low-income and minority kids getting second-class educations in the U.S.? That question is at the center of the heated debate about tenure protections and who gets them.
 
July 28, 2014 | NPR · Only one movie in July, Transformers: Age of Extinction, has broken the 100 million mark during its opening weekend. Box office receipts all summer have proven anemic. Paul Dergarabedian, a senior media analyst with RENTRAK, talks to Audie Cornish about the box office slump.
 

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July 26, 2014 | NPR · Hezbollah has been a longtime ally of Hamas, but during this most recent conflict between Israel and Gaza they've taken a sideline role. NPR's Scott Simon talks to the BBC's Kim Ghattas in Beirut.
 

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July 27, 2014 | NPR · Fighting in Ukraine near the crash site of Malaysia Airlines Flight MH17 has international investigators staying away. NPR's Arun Rath talks with OSCE's Michael Bociurkiw about the investigation.
 

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Diseases

Nov 23, 2013 — When the earthquake strikes — the big one that Californians have been warned about — Shy finds himself on a cruise ship serving towels to the wealthy patrons. But he's not out of harm's way. Matt de la Pena discusses his new novel, The Living, with NPR's Scott Simon.
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Nov 11, 2013 — Young adult fiction writer Matt de la Peņa didn't finish reading a novel until he was in college. In his Mexican-American family, men who read books were seen as "soft." But he discovered his passion in literature, which he now shares with his young readers and family.
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Aug 16, 2013 — In Brain on Fire, appearing at No. 9, Susannah Cahalan looks back on her battle with a rare disease.
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Aug 5, 2013 — In softcover nonfiction, David Randall examines the science of sleep, and Susannah Cahalan falls prey to a mysterious disease. In fiction, Claire Vaye Watkins explores the American West, and Ivan Doig looks at a single dad whose world is upended.
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Apr 22, 2013 — Animals and humans have a lot in common, including some of the health problems that plague them. In her book Zoobiquity, Dr. Barbara Natterson-Horowitz explores how studying animal illness — from cancer to sexual dysfunction — can help us better understand human health.
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Oct 22, 2012 — Novelist Jodi Picoult explores life and death, while oncologist David Agus models new health practices, virologist Nathan Wolfe tracks emerging diseases, Dava Sobel reflects on Copernicus, and Charles Shields looks at novelist Kurt Vonnegut.
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Jun 12, 2012 — A new book called Zoobiquity explores the diseases that humans and animals have in common. Dr. Barbara Natterson-Horowitz and journalist Kathryn Bowers explain how fainting fish, obese dragonflies, depressed gorillas and monkeys with heart failure can help inform human health.
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Sep 8, 2009 — When coping with cancer, sometimes laughter is the best medicine. Kairol Rosenthal and Iva Skoch explain the phenomenon of "cancertainment."
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May 22, 2008 — News spread quickly on Tuesday when doctors announced that Senator Ted Kennedy had a malignant brain tumor. Guests and callers discuss the difficult decisions public figures and their families must make when faced with serious health problems.
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