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July 28, 2014 | NPR · Argentina says it cannot pay certain debts and will fall into default by July 31 if it can't come to an agreement with creditors. This would be Argentina's second default in 13 years.
 
July 28, 2014 | NPR · Even though Spain's economy is out of recession, youth unemployment has hit 57.7 percent. Economists say it could be years before jobs return. By then, many will have missed a decade or more of work.
 
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July 28, 2014 | NPR · To withstand their 9,300-mile migration, red knots feast on eggs from horseshoe crabs each spring in Delaware Bay. Scientists worry many crabs are starting to lay eggs before the birds can get there.
 

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July 28, 2014 | NPR · A new salvo has been fired in the fight over teacher tenure. A group led by former TV anchor Campbell Brown filed a complaint in New York state court, arguing that tenure laws are preventing the state from providing every child with the "sound, basic education" its constitution guarantees.
 
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July 28, 2014 | NPR · Why are so many low-income and minority kids getting second-class educations in the U.S.? That question is at the center of the heated debate about tenure protections and who gets them.
 
July 28, 2014 | NPR · Only one movie in July, Transformers: Age of Extinction, has broken the 100 million mark during its opening weekend. Box office receipts all summer have proven anemic. Paul Dergarabedian, a senior media analyst with RENTRAK, talks to Audie Cornish about the box office slump.
 

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July 26, 2014 | NPR · Hezbollah has been a longtime ally of Hamas, but during this most recent conflict between Israel and Gaza they've taken a sideline role. NPR's Scott Simon talks to the BBC's Kim Ghattas in Beirut.
 

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July 27, 2014 | NPR · Fighting in Ukraine near the crash site of Malaysia Airlines Flight MH17 has international investigators staying away. NPR's Arun Rath talks with OSCE's Michael Bociurkiw about the investigation.
 

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Soccer

Jun 6, 2014 — The World Cup begins next week in Brazil. Before it gets going, check out the work of an author who has spent decades writing about Latin America, and who has a particular affinity for soccer.
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Apr 8, 2013 — In fiction, Stephen L. Carter's reimagining of Lincoln's presidency and Joshua Henkin's tale of a family's fragmented mourning arrive in paperback. In softcover nonfiction, Bill Clegg recounts his attempt to stay clean, and Tim Kreider lifts the curtain on the human condition.
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Oct 17, 2012 — In the age of the Internet, data is everywhere — the question is how to use it. Author Doug Lemov recommends three books about the power of information. What is your favorite number-crunching book? Tell us in the comments.
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May 30, 2012 — A Greek poet contemplates the twisted strands of history, while Daniel Orozco's stories consider the dark side of our day jobs and Donald Rumsfeld reflects on the Iraq War. On the lighter side, CBS' Jim Axelrod revisits his marathon training, and a writer and an economist infuse soccer with numbers.
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Mar 28, 2012 — In This Love Is Not for Cowards, Robert Andrew Powell describes the violence devastating Ciudad Juarez and the flailing local soccer team that binds residents together. An ode to loyalty — to a terrible team and a terrible town.
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May 28, 2010 — Though the 2010 FIFA World Cup is still weeks away, writer Cord Jefferson feels Americans could do with an early tune-up on the world's most popular sport. Here are three books to put your soccer ball in motion.
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Oct 10, 2009 — The protagonist of After, Amy Efaw's new novel for young adults, is a 15-year-old straight-A student and Olympic hopeful who winds up in jail, charged with trying to murder her newborn baby.
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Sep 14, 2009 — In 2004, Awista Ayub, an Afghan immigrant to the U.S., formed the Afghan Youth Sports Exchange and brought eight Afghan girls to the U.S. to play soccer. In her new book However Tall the Mountain, Ayub tells the story of the young athletes who left their war-torn country to play the game the loved.
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Jul 17, 2009 — The high-priced star's first year of U.S. Major League Soccer did not work out well for him or his team. Now, he's returning on loan in the middle of the season during the debut of a tell-all book that casts Beckham in an unfavorable light.
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Jun 6, 2006 — Ed Gordon talks with Sean Wilsey, co-editor of The Thinking Fan's Guide to the World Cup, about the FIFA World Cup international soccer tournament, which starts Friday with matches in two cities in Germany. Wilsey says the goodwill generated by global interest in the World Cup can best counter racism among some soccer fans in Europe, who deride black and Latino players — even from their own favorite teams.
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