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August 27, 2014 | NPR · The report said it couldn't be proven that anyone had died because of wait times at the medical center in Phoenix. On Tuesday, President Obama pledged to do better by vets and announced initiatives.
 
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August 27, 2014 | SCPR · The Los Angeles Unified School District has shut down a half-a-billion-dollar deal with Apple and Pearson to provide classroom technology. Here's what happened.
 
August 27, 2014 | NPR · Schools in Napa Valley are to reopen Wednesday after the area's worst earthquake in decades. Hundreds of buildings and homes were damaged and a lot of rebuilding work remains to be done.
 

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August 26, 2014 | NPR · Dr. Tom Frieden, director of the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, has arrived in West Africa to assess the Ebola outbreak. The situation in Liberia, he says, is "absolutely unprecedented."
 
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August 26, 2014 | NPR · An inquiry in the U.K. has found that more than 1,400 children have been sexually abused by an organized ring of men in the northern English town of Rotherham.
 
August 26, 2014 | NPR · Robert Siegel speaks with Stephen R. Kelly, a visiting professor at Duke University, about how North and South Carolina hope to resolve questions about the border between them. The original border, which was mandated by the British during the colonial era, was never surveyed properly. That's caused headaches ever since the 18th century.
 

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August 23, 2014 | NPR · Nearly 1,500 people have died in the Ebola outbreak, and more nations in the region are closing their borders. NPR's Scott Simon speaks to Africa correspondent Ofeibea Quist-Arcton about the epidemic.
 

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August 24, 2014 | NPR · In the wake of violent clashes between protesters and police in Ferguson, Mo., President Obama is ordering a review of the federal programs that help local police departments purchase military gear.
 

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Soccer

Jun 6, 2014 — The World Cup begins next week in Brazil. Before it gets going, check out the work of an author who has spent decades writing about Latin America, and who has a particular affinity for soccer.
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Apr 8, 2013 — In fiction, Stephen L. Carter's reimagining of Lincoln's presidency and Joshua Henkin's tale of a family's fragmented mourning arrive in paperback. In softcover nonfiction, Bill Clegg recounts his attempt to stay clean, and Tim Kreider lifts the curtain on the human condition.
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Oct 17, 2012 — In the age of the Internet, data is everywhere — the question is how to use it. Author Doug Lemov recommends three books about the power of information. What is your favorite number-crunching book? Tell us in the comments.
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May 30, 2012 — A Greek poet contemplates the twisted strands of history, while Daniel Orozco's stories consider the dark side of our day jobs and Donald Rumsfeld reflects on the Iraq War. On the lighter side, CBS' Jim Axelrod revisits his marathon training, and a writer and an economist infuse soccer with numbers.
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Mar 28, 2012 — In This Love Is Not for Cowards, Robert Andrew Powell describes the violence devastating Ciudad Juarez and the flailing local soccer team that binds residents together. An ode to loyalty — to a terrible team and a terrible town.
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May 28, 2010 — Though the 2010 FIFA World Cup is still weeks away, writer Cord Jefferson feels Americans could do with an early tune-up on the world's most popular sport. Here are three books to put your soccer ball in motion.
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Oct 10, 2009 — The protagonist of After, Amy Efaw's new novel for young adults, is a 15-year-old straight-A student and Olympic hopeful who winds up in jail, charged with trying to murder her newborn baby.
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Sep 14, 2009 — In 2004, Awista Ayub, an Afghan immigrant to the U.S., formed the Afghan Youth Sports Exchange and brought eight Afghan girls to the U.S. to play soccer. In her new book However Tall the Mountain, Ayub tells the story of the young athletes who left their war-torn country to play the game the loved.
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Jul 17, 2009 — The high-priced star's first year of U.S. Major League Soccer did not work out well for him or his team. Now, he's returning on loan in the middle of the season during the debut of a tell-all book that casts Beckham in an unfavorable light.
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Jun 6, 2006 — Ed Gordon talks with Sean Wilsey, co-editor of The Thinking Fan's Guide to the World Cup, about the FIFA World Cup international soccer tournament, which starts Friday with matches in two cities in Germany. Wilsey says the goodwill generated by global interest in the World Cup can best counter racism among some soccer fans in Europe, who deride black and Latino players — even from their own favorite teams.
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