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April 16, 2014 | NPR · Schoolgirls were kidnapped in Nigeria Tuesday. The suspects are believed to be with a radical group blamed for a bombing Monday. Kelly McEvers talks to Michelle Faul of The Associated Press.
 
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April 16, 2014 | NPR · Fans and foes want to know whether the Affordable Care Act is meeting its goals. But, for good reasons, there are no clear answers yet.
 
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April 16, 2014 | NPR · A year after the Boston Marathon bombing, Heather Abbott has adapted to life with her prostheses, including a blade for running and one that allows her to wear her favorite shoes.
 

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April 15, 2014 | NPR · One year has passed since bombs rocked the finish line of the Boston Marathon. The city honored victims of the tragedy Tuesday with a tribute, including speeches from three of the victims themselves.
 
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April 15, 2014 | WBUR · At last year's Boston Marathon, Carol Downing was just half a mile from the finish line when bombs exploded and injured two of her daughters. This year, she's returning to complete the race.
 
April 15, 2014 | NPR · Each April, the shad come back to the Delaware River to spawn, and thousands of anglers in New Jersey and Pennsylvania eagerly await them. Celebrating their annual return is a local spring tradition.
 

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April 12, 2014 | NPR · As pro-Russia demonstrators continue their tense standoff in Eastern Ukraine, police are conspicuously absent from city streets.
 

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April 13, 2014 | NPR · As the anniversary of last year's marathon bombing approaches, NPR's Rachel Martin speaks with correspondent Carrie Johnson about the investigation and legal wrangling yet to come.
 

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Mark Bowden

Jun 10, 2013 — In softcover nonfiction, Daniel Smith explores his anxiety, and Mark Bowden looks at the killing of Osama bin Laden. In fiction, Pablo Medina follows a boy caring for his aging, Cuban-American parents, and Jean Zimmerman tracks a 17th-century investigation into the disappearance of orphan children.
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Oct 16, 2012Black Hawk Down author Mark Bowden's new book outlines the changes in warfare since the Sept. 11, 2001, terrorist attacks, and the way our increasing computational power has helped capture terrorists like Osama bin Laden.
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Sep 27, 2011 — As many as 12 million computers worldwide have been infected with a highly encrypted computer worm called Conficker. Writer Mark Bowden details how Conficker was discovered, how it works, and the ongoing programming battle to bring down Conficker in his book Worm: The First Digital World War.
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May 31, 2006 — Commentator Mark Bowden says he is surprised that so many people tell him the U.S. was to blame for the hostage crisis in 1979. He says the Iranians were wrong then, and they're wrong now in their brinksmanship over nuclear weapons. Later this week, we will hear another point of view from Barry Rosen, who was one of the hostages in Iran.
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May 26, 2006 — Here's a way to travel, without suffering the high prices of fuel these days: Read one of Alan Cheuse's summer reading book picks. One of them is bound to move you someplace beyond your beach chair.
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May 26, 2006 — Alan Cheuse selects Mark Bowden's account of the Iranian hostage crisis in his annual roundup of summer reading choices for All Things Considered: "This is Pulitzer-Prize material. Turn your keen eye to it."
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May 1, 2006 — This past week marked the 26th anniversary of the failed rescue attempt of hostages held at the U.S. Embassy in Tehran for 444 days. We talks with journalist Mark Bowden, author of Guests of the Ayatollah: The First Battle in America's War with Militant Islam.
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