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April 24, 2014 | NPR · Hundreds of civilians have been massacred in the South Sudan town of Bentiu. For more, Steve Inskeep talks to Andrew Green, the South Sudan bureau chief for the Voice of America.
 
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April 24, 2014 | NPR · One year ago, a factory building in Bangladesh collapsed, killing more than 1,100 workers. Top retailers have begun inspecting factories more aggressively, but other steps have fallen short.
 
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April 24, 2014 | NPR · Some of the factors keeping low-income students from getting into college aren't always obvious to the public, higher education insiders tell Morning Edition's David Greene.
 

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April 21, 2014 | NPR · Last year a scientist said he'd found a new form of botulinum toxin, and was keeping details secret to keep the recipe from terrorists. But other science and public health labs were shut out, too.
 
April 23, 2014 | NPR · Pharmaceutical companies are suddenly trading entire divisions the way sports teams swap players. Glaxo, Novartis and Ely Lily are all involved in a complicated deal announced Tuesday, and so far this year, five deals exceeding $2 billion have been announced. What's driving the deal-making?
 
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April 23, 2014 | NPR · For decades, a mysterious quacking "bio-duck" has been heard roaming the waters of the Southern Ocean. Now scientists say the source is a whale.
 

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April 19, 2014 | NPR · The search continues for hundreds of people, mostly students, who were on board a South Korean ferry when it sank this week. Correspondent Anthony Kuhn shares the latest with NPR's Wade Goodwyn.
 

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April 20, 2014 | NPR · Monday is the 2014 Boston Marathon. Security will be tight, and this year's race will be an emotional event that will be about more than who wins.
 

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Chronology

Jul 17, 2011 — NPR coverage of 30,000 Years of Art: The Story of Human Creativity Across Time and Space by Inc. Phaidon. News, author interviews, critics' picks and more.
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Mar 31, 2008 — As Women's History Month comes to a close, authors Charlotte Waisman and Jill Tietjan talk about their new book, Her Story: A Timeline of Women Who Changed America. The book — in stores on April 1st — highlights more than 900 women who left their mark on the nation's history.
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Jan 13, 2008 — The ambitious new work 30,000 Years of Art celebrates human creativity from 28,000 B.C. to the present day. From primitive carvings to masterpieces by Velazquez and others, the tome presents 1,000 works in chronological order.
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May 31, 2006 — Commentator Mark Bowden says he is surprised that so many people tell him the U.S. was to blame for the hostage crisis in 1979. He says the Iranians were wrong then, and they're wrong now in their brinksmanship over nuclear weapons. Later this week, we will hear another point of view from Barry Rosen, who was one of the hostages in Iran.
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May 26, 2006 — Here's a way to travel, without suffering the high prices of fuel these days: Read one of Alan Cheuse's summer reading book picks. One of them is bound to move you someplace beyond your beach chair.
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May 26, 2006 — Alan Cheuse selects Mark Bowden's account of the Iranian hostage crisis in his annual roundup of summer reading choices for All Things Considered: "This is Pulitzer-Prize material. Turn your keen eye to it."
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May 1, 2006 — This past week marked the 26th anniversary of the failed rescue attempt of hostages held at the U.S. Embassy in Tehran for 444 days. We talks with journalist Mark Bowden, author of Guests of the Ayatollah: The First Battle in America's War with Militant Islam.
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