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August 27, 2014 | NPR · The report said it couldn't be proven that anyone had died because of wait times at the medical center in Phoenix. On Tuesday, President Obama pledged to do better by vets and announced initiatives.
 
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August 27, 2014 | SCPR · The Los Angeles Unified School District has shut down a half-a-billion-dollar deal with Apple and Pearson to provide classroom technology. Here's what happened.
 
August 27, 2014 | NPR · Schools in Napa Valley are to reopen Wednesday after the area's worst earthquake in decades. Hundreds of buildings and homes were damaged and a lot of rebuilding work remains to be done.
 

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August 26, 2014 | NPR · Dr. Tom Frieden, director of the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, has arrived in West Africa to assess the Ebola outbreak. The situation in Liberia, he says, is "absolutely unprecedented."
 
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August 26, 2014 | NPR · An inquiry in the U.K. has found that more than 1,400 children have been sexually abused by an organized ring of men in the northern English town of Rotherham.
 
August 26, 2014 | NPR · Robert Siegel speaks with Stephen R. Kelly, a visiting professor at Duke University, about how North and South Carolina hope to resolve questions about the border between them. The original border, which was mandated by the British during the colonial era, was never surveyed properly. That's caused headaches ever since the 18th century.
 

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August 23, 2014 | NPR · Nearly 1,500 people have died in the Ebola outbreak, and more nations in the region are closing their borders. NPR's Scott Simon speaks to Africa correspondent Ofeibea Quist-Arcton about the epidemic.
 

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August 24, 2014 | NPR · In the wake of violent clashes between protesters and police in Ferguson, Mo., President Obama is ordering a review of the federal programs that help local police departments purchase military gear.
 

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Mathematicians

Jan 13, 2013 — Dorothy Wrinch was the first woman to ever receive a doctorate in science from Oxford University, and she was the first person to design a protein structure. But her name is largely unknown. I Died for Beauty, a biography of Wrinch by Marjorie Senechal, tells her story.
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Feb 26, 2012 — In the mid-1980s, Simon Norton was considered one of the great mathematical prodigies of the 20th century. Decades later, biographer Alexander Masters just knew him as the unkempt, eccentric man who lived downstairs. Their friendship is documented in Simon: The Genius in My Basement.
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Jul 15, 2011 — NPR coverage of The Infinities by John Banville. News, author interviews, critics' picks and more.
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Mar 8, 2010 — The latest novel from John Banville throws a handful of Greek gods into the household of a glum human family to explore sex, love, faith and mortality. Reviewer Maureen Corrigan says The Infinities puts Banville's literary gifts on prominent display.
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Dec 3, 2009 — Correspondent Susan Stamberg gathers recommendations for the season's best books from booksellers Rona Brinlee, Daniel Goldin and Lucia Silva. Their selections include comics about philosophy, novels about building families, and a box set that dives into the process of writing.
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Dec 3, 2009 — This math and philosophy-obsessed graphic novel, by Apostolos Doxiadis and Christos H. Papadimitiou with art by Alecos Papadatos and Annie DiDonna, charts the quest of Nobel Prize-winner Bertrand Russell to find logic in mathematics.
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Mar 3, 2009 — Math can do some really neat stuff: From telling us about the existence of Neptune before we could see it, to the black holes we still can't, numbers are capable of a lot of things you didn't learn about in grade school. So why can't they predict economic crises? Commentator Mario Livio will tell you.
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Oct 13, 2007 — In his new historical novel, David Leavitt re-creates the life and times of Srinvasa Ramanujan, a math genius who was recruited to Cambridge University during World War I. Ramanujan died young, but had a lasting impact on his field and his colleagues.
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