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August 28, 2014 | NPR · For the first time, researchers have tracked the spread of Ebola, almost in real time, during an outbreak. The virus is quickly changing its genetic code. But it's unclear what the mutations mean.
 
August 29, 2014 | NPR · French President Francois Hollande is under pressure to fix the country's economy, which is overburdened by regulation and failing a generation of young people. He's also facing calls for austerity.
 
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August 29, 2014 | NPR · Congressman and former Republican vice presidential nominee Paul Ryan discusses his new book, The Way Forward: Renewing the American Idea.
 

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August 31, 2014 | NPR · On Sunday, Iraqi and Kurdish forces broke a nearly 80-day siege by the Islamic State on the town of Amerli, where residents now have enough food and water for the first time in weeks.
 
August 31, 2014 | NPR · The U.S. military's attention to PTSD is well-documented but Kurdish fighters living with the same disorder haven't received nearly as much care. Arun Rath talks to journalist Jenna Krajeski.
 
August 31, 2014 | NPR · Arun Rath talks to journalist Shane Harris about his Foreign Policy story on "Lady al-Qaida," Aafia Siddiqui. The Pakistani-born woman was arrested in Afghanistan in 2008.
 

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August 30, 2014 | NPR · Ukrainian forces are defending the port city of Novoazovsk from what they say is a Russian invasion. Scott Simon talks to correspondent Soraya Sarhaddi Nelson.
 

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August 31, 2014 | NPR · Immigration remains one of the most challenging issues for President Obama. Political correspondent Mara Liasson discusses the political cost of the choices before him with Linda Wertheimer.
 

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Mathematicians

Jan 13, 2013 — Dorothy Wrinch was the first woman to ever receive a doctorate in science from Oxford University, and she was the first person to design a protein structure. But her name is largely unknown. I Died for Beauty, a biography of Wrinch by Marjorie Senechal, tells her story.
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Feb 26, 2012 — In the mid-1980s, Simon Norton was considered one of the great mathematical prodigies of the 20th century. Decades later, biographer Alexander Masters just knew him as the unkempt, eccentric man who lived downstairs. Their friendship is documented in Simon: The Genius in My Basement.
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Jul 15, 2011 — NPR coverage of The Infinities by John Banville. News, author interviews, critics' picks and more.
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Mar 8, 2010 — The latest novel from John Banville throws a handful of Greek gods into the household of a glum human family to explore sex, love, faith and mortality. Reviewer Maureen Corrigan says The Infinities puts Banville's literary gifts on prominent display.
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Dec 3, 2009 — Correspondent Susan Stamberg gathers recommendations for the season's best books from booksellers Rona Brinlee, Daniel Goldin and Lucia Silva. Their selections include comics about philosophy, novels about building families, and a box set that dives into the process of writing.
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Dec 3, 2009 — This math and philosophy-obsessed graphic novel, by Apostolos Doxiadis and Christos H. Papadimitiou with art by Alecos Papadatos and Annie DiDonna, charts the quest of Nobel Prize-winner Bertrand Russell to find logic in mathematics.
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Mar 3, 2009 — Math can do some really neat stuff: From telling us about the existence of Neptune before we could see it, to the black holes we still can't, numbers are capable of a lot of things you didn't learn about in grade school. So why can't they predict economic crises? Commentator Mario Livio will tell you.
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Oct 13, 2007 — In his new historical novel, David Leavitt re-creates the life and times of Srinvasa Ramanujan, a math genius who was recruited to Cambridge University during World War I. Ramanujan died young, but had a lasting impact on his field and his colleagues.
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