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July 30, 2014 | KQED · Adding a translation to the English label would require bigger bottles, pharmacists say. They worry patients would wind up carrying a few pills around loose — without any instructions at all.
 
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July 30, 2014 | WNYC · In the last 20 years, New Jersey went from having more than 20 percent of U.S. pharmaceutical manufacturing jobs to less than 10 percent. That means offices, labs and warehouses have gone dark.
 
July 30, 2014 | NPR · Sheik Humarr Khan, one of the doctors fighting to control West Africa's largest Ebola outbreak, died Tuesday in Sierra Leone. He was 39.
 

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July 29, 2014 | KERA · After caring for Ebola patients for several months in West Africa, Dr. Kent Brantly noticed last week that he had symptoms. The 33-year-old immediately put himself into a Liberian isolation ward.
 
July 29, 2014 | NPR · Virologist Thomas Geisbert has spent decades studying Ebola and other hemorrhagic fevers. He speaks to Audie Cornish about the current Ebola outbreak, the worst in history, and how it might be contained this time around.
 
July 29, 2014 | NPR · The Eid festival, which celebrates the end of Ramadan, serves as a time for visiting relatives and exchanging gifts. But one family's holiday in Gaza traces the death and displacement wrought by the war between Hamas and Israel.
 

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July 26, 2014 | NPR · Hezbollah has been a longtime ally of Hamas, but during this most recent conflict between Israel and Gaza they've taken a sideline role. NPR's Scott Simon talks to the BBC's Kim Ghattas in Beirut.
 

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July 27, 2014 | NPR · Fighting in Ukraine near the crash site of Malaysia Airlines Flight MH17 has international investigators staying away. NPR's Arun Rath talks with OSCE's Michael Bociurkiw about the investigation.
 

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Mathematicians

Jan 13, 2013 — Dorothy Wrinch was the first woman to ever receive a doctorate in science from Oxford University, and she was the first person to design a protein structure. But her name is largely unknown. I Died for Beauty, a biography of Wrinch by Marjorie Senechal, tells her story.
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Feb 26, 2012 — In the mid-1980s, Simon Norton was considered one of the great mathematical prodigies of the 20th century. Decades later, biographer Alexander Masters just knew him as the unkempt, eccentric man who lived downstairs. Their friendship is documented in Simon: The Genius in My Basement.
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Jul 15, 2011 — NPR coverage of The Infinities by John Banville. News, author interviews, critics' picks and more.
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Mar 8, 2010 — The latest novel from John Banville throws a handful of Greek gods into the household of a glum human family to explore sex, love, faith and mortality. Reviewer Maureen Corrigan says The Infinities puts Banville's literary gifts on prominent display.
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Dec 3, 2009 — Correspondent Susan Stamberg gathers recommendations for the season's best books from booksellers Rona Brinlee, Daniel Goldin and Lucia Silva. Their selections include comics about philosophy, novels about building families, and a box set that dives into the process of writing.
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Dec 3, 2009 — This math and philosophy-obsessed graphic novel, by Apostolos Doxiadis and Christos H. Papadimitiou with art by Alecos Papadatos and Annie DiDonna, charts the quest of Nobel Prize-winner Bertrand Russell to find logic in mathematics.
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Mar 3, 2009 — Math can do some really neat stuff: From telling us about the existence of Neptune before we could see it, to the black holes we still can't, numbers are capable of a lot of things you didn't learn about in grade school. So why can't they predict economic crises? Commentator Mario Livio will tell you.
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Oct 13, 2007 — In his new historical novel, David Leavitt re-creates the life and times of Srinvasa Ramanujan, a math genius who was recruited to Cambridge University during World War I. Ramanujan died young, but had a lasting impact on his field and his colleagues.
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