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April 15, 2014 | NPR · The acting Ukrainian president says his military is advancing against pro-Russian separatists who took over government buildings in eastern Ukraine. The separatists didn't comply with an ultimatum.
 
April 15, 2014 | NPR · As part of NPR's anniversary coverage of the Boston Marathon bombing, Morning Edition co-host David Greene talks to Mass. Gov. Deval Patrick about that day.
 
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April 15, 2014 | NPR · The bloody 1989 crackdown in Beijing changed China, NPR's Louisa Lim explains in a new book. She also chronicles the brutal repression that took place in another city — and remained hidden until now.
 

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April 15, 2014 | NPR · One year has passed since bombs rocked the finish line of the Boston Marathon. The city honored victims of the tragedy Tuesday with a tribute, including speeches from three of the victims themselves.
 
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April 15, 2014 | WBUR · At last year's Boston Marathon, Carol Downing was just half a mile from the finish line when bombs exploded and injured two of her daughters. This year, she's returning to complete the race.
 
April 15, 2014 | NPR · Each April, the shad come back to the Delaware River to spawn, and thousands of anglers in New Jersey and Pennsylvania eagerly await them. Celebrating their annual return is a local spring tradition.
 

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April 12, 2014 | NPR · As pro-Russia demonstrators continue their tense standoff in Eastern Ukraine, police are conspicuously absent from city streets.
 

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April 13, 2014 | NPR · As the anniversary of last year's marathon bombing approaches, NPR's Rachel Martin speaks with correspondent Carrie Johnson about the investigation and legal wrangling yet to come.
 

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Thought and thinking

Apr 26, 2013 — At No. 4, Daniel Kahneman's Thinking, Fast And Slow explores the psychology of decision-making.
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Jul 10, 2012 — Where do ideas come from and how can we have more of them? Science writer Jonah Lehrer recommends five books that explore the mysteries of the creative mind, and document the strange and beautiful world that our ideas have helped create.
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Dec 8, 2011Thinking, Fast and Slow — an exploration of decision making — appears on the list for a second week.
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Oct 19, 2011 — Daniel Kahneman won a Nobel Prize in 2002 for his work on the psychology of decision-making. Now, in Thinking, Fast and Slow, Kahneman revisits and recasts his world-famous research on what he calls "the machinery of the mind."
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May 19, 2010 — If you're intensely watching a ball game, and a gorilla walks onto the court, you'd notice him ... right? Believe it or not, there's actually a 50 percent chance you'd miss him entirely. Christopher Chabris and Daniel Simons, authors of The Invisible Gorilla, explain how our brains trick us into thinking we see and know far more than we actually do.
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Mar 31, 2008 — Ariely's new book, Predictably Irrational examines real-life decision making in an effort to determine why we waste money, underestimate risks, and procrastinate.
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Feb 21, 2008 — Behavioral economist Dan Ariely studies the way people make economic decisions. In his book, Predictably Irrational, he explains how the reasoning behind these decisions is often flawed due to invisible forces at work in people's brains.
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Oct 17, 2007 — In his new book, The Stuff of Thought, psychologist Steven Pinker sorts through some of the paradoxes of profanity. He points out that in a society that prides itself on free speech, certain words pertaining to sex and excretion remain off-limits.
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Sep 14, 2007 — In English, we can babble, bark, bleat and bray. But we can also ask, cite, pose, preach and tell. Psychologist Steven Pinker says that studying how we use these verbs provides a window into human nature. Pinker discusses his new book, The Stuff of Thought.
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