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August 20, 2014 | NPR · If you venture away from the protest zone in Ferguson, Mo., there is an idyllic neighborhood, which doesn't have much patience for the out-of-towners who have joined the protests.
 
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August 20, 2014 | NPR · President Obama has carefully avoided taking sides following the shooting of Missouri teen Michael Brown, disappointing some African-American observers.
 
August 20, 2014 | NPR · Texas ranks 49th out of 50 states in how much funding it commits to mental health. But San Antonio has become a model for other mental health systems. It has saved $50 million over the past 5 years.
 

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August 20, 2014 | NPR · Demonstrators want an indictment of the police officer who fatally shot Michael Brown earlier this month. But investigations — one of them a federal civil rights case — can take weeks, if not months.
 
August 20, 2014 | NPR · More than a week now from the police shooting in Ferguson, Mo., it's worth asking: Ideally, what should happen with a police officer stops someone in the street?
 
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August 20, 2014 | NPR · Enlisting has been a rite of passage for men in the Pierce family since the Civil War. And as America has changed, Mark Pierce and his son Jeremy explain, what it means to serve has, too.
 

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August 16, 2014 | NPR · Both Ukraine and Russia say they're trying to send supplies to residents in eastern Ukraine. But with tensions on both sides running high, that aid may take a while to arrive.
 

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August 17, 2014 | NPR · American fighter jets and drones carried out airstrikes against Islamist targets near the Mosul Dam in northern Iraq on Saturday. A breach of the dam could threaten entire cities.
 

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Thought and thinking

Apr 26, 2013 — At No. 4, Daniel Kahneman's Thinking, Fast And Slow explores the psychology of decision-making.
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Jul 10, 2012 — Where do ideas come from and how can we have more of them? Science writer Jonah Lehrer recommends five books that explore the mysteries of the creative mind, and document the strange and beautiful world that our ideas have helped create.
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Dec 8, 2011Thinking, Fast and Slow — an exploration of decision making — appears on the list for a second week.
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Oct 19, 2011 — Daniel Kahneman won a Nobel Prize in 2002 for his work on the psychology of decision-making. Now, in Thinking, Fast and Slow, Kahneman revisits and recasts his world-famous research on what he calls "the machinery of the mind."
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May 19, 2010 — If you're intensely watching a ball game, and a gorilla walks onto the court, you'd notice him ... right? Believe it or not, there's actually a 50 percent chance you'd miss him entirely. Christopher Chabris and Daniel Simons, authors of The Invisible Gorilla, explain how our brains trick us into thinking we see and know far more than we actually do.
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Mar 31, 2008 — Ariely's new book, Predictably Irrational examines real-life decision making in an effort to determine why we waste money, underestimate risks, and procrastinate.
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Feb 21, 2008 — Behavioral economist Dan Ariely studies the way people make economic decisions. In his book, Predictably Irrational, he explains how the reasoning behind these decisions is often flawed due to invisible forces at work in people's brains.
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Oct 17, 2007 — In his new book, The Stuff of Thought, psychologist Steven Pinker sorts through some of the paradoxes of profanity. He points out that in a society that prides itself on free speech, certain words pertaining to sex and excretion remain off-limits.
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Sep 14, 2007 — In English, we can babble, bark, bleat and bray. But we can also ask, cite, pose, preach and tell. Psychologist Steven Pinker says that studying how we use these verbs provides a window into human nature. Pinker discusses his new book, The Stuff of Thought.
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