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July 28, 2014 | NPR · Argentina says it cannot pay certain debts and will fall into default by July 31 if it can't come to an agreement with creditors. This would be Argentina's second default in 13 years.
 
July 28, 2014 | NPR · Even though Spain's economy is out of recession, youth unemployment has hit 57.7 percent. Economists say it could be years before jobs return. By then, many will have missed a decade or more of work.
 
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July 28, 2014 | NPR · To withstand their 9,300-mile migration, red knots feast on eggs from horseshoe crabs each spring in Delaware Bay. Scientists worry many crabs are starting to lay eggs before the birds can get there.
 

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November 1, 2009 | NPR · Every weekday, All Things Considered hosts Robert Siegel, Melissa Block and Audie Cornish present the program's trademark mix of news, interviews, commentaries, reviews, and offbeat features.
 
July 28, 2014 | NPR · A new salvo has been fired in the fight over teacher tenure. A group led by former TV anchor Campbell Brown filed a complaint in New York state court, arguing that tenure laws are preventing the state from providing every child with the "sound, basic education" its constitution guarantees.
 
July 28, 2014 | NPR · Why are so many low-income and minority kids getting second-class educations in the U.S.? That question is at the center of the heated debate about tenure protections and who gets them.
 

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July 26, 2014 | NPR · Hezbollah has been a longtime ally of Hamas, but during this most recent conflict between Israel and Gaza they've taken a sideline role. NPR's Scott Simon talks to the BBC's Kim Ghattas in Beirut.
 

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July 27, 2014 | NPR · Fighting in Ukraine near the crash site of Malaysia Airlines Flight MH17 has international investigators staying away. NPR's Arun Rath talks with OSCE's Michael Bociurkiw about the investigation.
 

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Surgeons

Jul 7, 2013 — Thousands of soldiers died at the Battle of Gettysburg, but that number might have been higher had it not been for Jonathan Letterman, chief medical officer of the Union's Army of the Potomac. In Surgeon in Blue, Scott McGaugh explores Letterman's long-lasting legacy.
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Jan 19, 2012 — Science has a way of getting inside our heads — especially when it comes to the powers of the mind. Author and neurologist Alfredo Quinones-Hinojosa recommends three brilliant brain-teasing books.
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Feb 22, 2010 — William Halsted is credited with creating the United States' first surgical residency program and transforming the way operating rooms are sterilized. He was also a morphine addict. Plastic surgeon Gerald Imber details Halsted's dual lives in the new biography Genius on the Edge.
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Jun 10, 2009 — In 2008, Dr. Maria Siemionow and a team of doctors made history when they performed the first near-total face transplant in the United States. Siemionow writes about the procedure in the memoir Face to Face.
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Jan 27, 2007 — When Pauline Chen became a doctor, she was troubled by inconsistencies in the ways that fellow physicians dealt with the emotional aspect of death and dying. Chen tackles the subject in her new book: Final Exam: A Surgeon's Reflections on Mortality.
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