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July 30, 2014 | KQED · Adding a translation to the English label would require bigger bottles, pharmacists say. They worry patients would wind up carrying a few pills around loose — without any instructions at all.
 
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July 30, 2014 | WNYC · In the past 20 years, New Jersey went from having more than 20 percent of U.S. pharmaceutical manufacturing jobs to less than 10 percent. That means offices, labs and warehouses have gone dark.
 
July 30, 2014 | NPR · Sheik Humarr Khan, one of the doctors fighting to control West Africa's largest Ebola outbreak, died Tuesday in Sierra Leone. He was 39.
 

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July 30, 2014 | NPR · An explosion rocked a crowded Gaza market during what was expected to be a lull in the fighting. Earlier in the day a United Nations school was hit by what U.N. officials say was Israeli artillery fire, killing at least 15 people. Meanwhile, rocket fire from Gaza continues to be fired into Israel.
 
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July 30, 2014 | NPR · Hamas militants are using tunnels in and out of Gaza to strike inside Israel. Israelis are questioning how the tunnels grew to be so complex and why the military hasn't been able to shut them down.
 
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July 30, 2014 | NPR · A food blogger says dozens of distilleries are buying rye whiskey from a factory in Indiana and using it in bottles labeled "artisan."
 

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July 26, 2014 | NPR · Hezbollah has been a longtime ally of Hamas, but during this most recent conflict between Israel and Gaza they've taken a sideline role. NPR's Scott Simon talks to the BBC's Kim Ghattas in Beirut.
 

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July 27, 2014 | NPR · Fighting in Ukraine near the crash site of Malaysia Airlines Flight MH17 has international investigators staying away. NPR's Arun Rath talks with OSCE's Michael Bociurkiw about the investigation.
 

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Chris Cleave

Apr 29, 2013 — In nonfiction, Jonathan Franzen's collection of recent essays and Bob Spitz's Julia Child biography arrive in paperback. In softcover fiction, Herta Muller and Kevin Powers render worlds of excruciating hardship, while Chris Cleave explores a complicated rivalry.
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Jul 20, 2012 — Commentator Barbara J. King recommends five novels that touch on topics in the natural and social sciences. She connects them with themes taken up here by the five writers at the 13.7 Cosmos and Culture blog.
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Jul 3, 2012 — Gear up for this summer's Games with Chris Cleave's new novel about three Olympic cyclists. With careful pacing, complex characters and an ambitious plot, the author of Little Bee crafts a tale of sports racing that explores themes of time, ambition and love.
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Jun 30, 2012 — Chris Cleave's newest novel chronicles the friendship and rivalry between cyclists training for the 2012 Olympics. He speaks with NPR's Scott Simon about the fascination of athletic rivalries, how he got in shape for the book and what he hopes readers will take away.
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Dec 3, 2009 — Correspondent Susan Stamberg gathers recommendations for the season's best books from booksellers Rona Brinlee, Daniel Goldin and Lucia Silva. Their selections include comics about philosophy, novels about building families, and a box set that dives into the process of writing.
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Dec 3, 2009 — The story of a young Nigerian girl stranded in a British immigration center, Chris Cleave's novel is about rebuilding family from scratch.
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Aug 11, 2005 — Book critic Maureen Corrigan reviews Icendiary, the debut novel by British writer Chris Cleave. The story is triggered by an al-Qaeda bomb attack on a London soccer match.
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Jul 15, 2011 — NPR coverage of Little Bee by Chris Cleave. News, author interviews, critics' picks and more.
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