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April 15, 2014 | NPR · The acting Ukrainian president says his military is advancing against pro-Russian separatists who took over government buildings in eastern Ukraine. The separatists didn't comply with an ultimatum.
 
April 15, 2014 | NPR · As part of NPR's anniversary coverage of the Boston Marathon bombing, Morning Edition co-host David Greene talks to Mass. Gov. Deval Patrick about that day.
 
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April 15, 2014 | NPR · The bloody 1989 crackdown in Beijing changed China, NPR's Louisa Lim explains in a new book. She also chronicles the brutal repression that took place in another city — and remained hidden until now.
 

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April 15, 2014 | NPR · One year has passed since bombs rocked the finish line of the Boston Marathon. The city honored victims of the tragedy Tuesday with a tribute, including speeches from three of the victims themselves.
 
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April 15, 2014 | WBUR · At last year's Boston Marathon, Carol Downing was just half a mile from the finish line when bombs exploded and injured two of her daughters. This year, she's returning to complete the race.
 
April 15, 2014 | NPR · Each April, the shad come back to the Delaware River to spawn, and thousands of anglers in New Jersey and Pennsylvania eagerly await them. Celebrating their annual return is a local spring tradition.
 

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April 12, 2014 | NPR · As pro-Russia demonstrators continue their tense standoff in Eastern Ukraine, police are conspicuously absent from city streets.
 

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April 13, 2014 | NPR · As the anniversary of last year's marathon bombing approaches, NPR's Rachel Martin speaks with correspondent Carrie Johnson about the investigation and legal wrangling yet to come.
 

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Mentally ill

Jun 10, 2013 — In softcover nonfiction, Daniel Smith explores his anxiety, and Mark Bowden looks at the killing of Osama bin Laden. In fiction, Pablo Medina follows a boy caring for his aging, Cuban-American parents, and Jean Zimmerman tracks a 17th-century investigation into the disappearance of orphan children.
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Aug 29, 2012 — In the author's latest novel, The Devil in Silver, a man is mistakenly committed to a mental hospital where a buffalo-headed monster stalks patients at night. LaValle tells Fresh Air why he picked monsters, about his family history of mental illness and how he had his own brush with psychological problems.
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Jul 27, 2012Monkey Mind, Daniel Smith's memoir of his experiences with anxiety, debuts this week at No. 10.
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Jul 5, 2012 — In Monkey Mind: A Memoir of Anxiety, Daniel Smith delves into his own experiences with crippling neuroses, which he believes can be controlled if not cured. Anxiety afflicts 18 percent of the adult U.S. population, so Smith's candid self-exploration may prove helpful to many.
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Jul 3, 2012 — Daniel Smith suffers from the kind of debilitating anxiety that brings on panic attacks, bouts of insomnia and thoughts about "existential ruin." In his new memoir Monkey Mind, Smith documents his experience coping with the disorder and how the condition has affected his relationships.
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Aug 14, 2009 — Have you ever wished you could e-mail or telephone a character from a book you're reading? A new "multiplatform transmedia experience" by authors J.C. Hutchins and Jordan Weisman offers readers the opportunity to do just that.
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Apr 17, 2006 — When journalist Pete Earley's son was diagnosed with bipolar disorder, it sent him on an effort not only to get his son properly diagnosed and treated, but to understand the nation's mental health system. Earley's book about the experience is Crazy: A Father's Search Through America's Mental Health Madness.
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