Latest News from NPR

on:

NCPR is supported by:

 
Hourly Newscast
4 min., 45 sec.

Programs

Latest program rundown

Coming up:

Latest Features:
September 2, 2014 | NPR · At a Labor Day picnic in Milwaukee, the president accused the GOP of blocking economic initiatives. He urged the sympathetic union audience to turn their frustration into political action in November.
 
AP
September 2, 2014 | NPR · The city's plan to restructure its debt has been praised as a creative way to protect both pensioners and its art museum. But some creditors — and residents — feel like they're being railroaded.
 
Courtesy of Prime Group
September 2, 2014 | NPR · A company called WTAS is reviving the defunct accounting firm's name and hoping clients have forgotten its associations with the Enron scandal.
 

Latest program rundown

Coming up:

Latest Features:
September 2, 2014 | NPR · The Islamist extremist group Islamic State has released a new video that purports to show the beheading of an American journalist named Steven Sotloff, whom the group threatened to kill two weeks ago.
 
September 2, 2014 | NPR · In response to unrest in eastern Ukraine, NATO is considering forming a rapid reaction force — a topic that will be discussed at a summit this week in Wales. But how will Russia react, and is this the right move for the alliance? To learn more, Audie Cornish speaks with Steven Pifer, the director of Arms Control and Non-Proliferation Initiative at the Brookings Institution.
 
NPR
September 2, 2014 | NPR · The Pentagon has been transferring mine-resistant, ambush-protected vehicles to local police. Built to protect U.S. forces from roadside bomb blasts at war, these huge vehicles aren't always welcome.
 

Latest Saturday rundown




WE Saturday Feature

August 30, 2014 | NPR · Ukrainian forces are defending the port city of Novoazovsk from what they say is a Russian invasion. Scott Simon talks to correspondent Soraya Sarhaddi Nelson.
 

Latest Sunday rundown


WE Sunday Feature

August 31, 2014 | NPR · Immigration remains one of the most challenging issues for President Obama. Political correspondent Mara Liasson discusses the political cost of the choices before him with Linda Wertheimer.
 

Latest program rundown

Coming up:

Undercover operations

May 9, 2014 — John le Carre's counterterrorism thriller, A Delicate Truth, appears at No.10.
Comments |
Sep 28, 2013 — In Blowback, Plame channels her expertise in nuclear counterproliferation into a "realistic portrait" of a female covert agent. Plame confesses that there's a lot of downtime in the life of a spy, but still, the CIA is "the world's biggest dating agency."
Launch in player | Comments |
May 16, 2013 — A dirty deed and official cover-up drive the plot in John le Carre's A Delicate Truth. The novel sets its sights on old-boy corruption and corporate criminality at the heart of the "Deep State," but critic Alan Cheuse finds this latest effort lacks the tension of le Carre's Cold War novels.
Comments |
Aug 16, 2012 — In fiction, novelists Sebastian Rotella and Tahmima Anam explore cultural frictions along South America's "triple border" and in Bangladesh, respectively. In nonfiction, Jermaine Jackson remembers his brother Michael, and Charles King explores the history of Odessa, Ukraine.
Comments |
Jun 26, 2012 — Love knows no bounds, and in these five books, passion leaps from the page. You'll be swept off your feet by three novels and two memoirs that take up the mischievous matters of the heart.
Comments |
Sep 24, 2011In his first novel, investigative reporter Sebastian Rotella explores the paranoia and tensions of a border patrol agent infiltrating a Mexican drug gang. Rotella uses his own experience covering South America to make the story as authentic as possible.
Launch in player | Comments |
Jul 15, 2011 — NPR coverage of A Quiet Flame by Philip Kerr. News, author interviews, critics' picks and more.
Comments |
Aug 13, 2009 — Set in the 1920s and 1930s — mostly in the section of the city that later became East Berlin — Philip Kerr's crime novels feature a climate of extreme violence and debauchery, full of rogues, cheats and liars.
Launch in player | Comments |
Feb 17, 2008 — For three years starting in 1975, NBA referee Bob Delaney lived inside the New Jersey mafia. He chronicles his time undercover with the mob — and his subsequent career as an NBA referee — in a new memoir.
Launch in player | Comments |
Jul 5, 2005 — Writer Charles Bowden's new book A Shadow in the City tells the story of an undercover cop who spent 23 years on the front lines of America's drug war. That mission takes its toll on the protagonist, who sees drugs ruin lives — those of users and dealers— and loses faith in the fight. Alex Chadwick talks to Bowden about the book.
Launch in player | Comments |
more Undercover operations from NPR