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July 30, 2014 | KQED · Adding a translation to the English label would require bigger bottles, pharmacists say. They worry patients would wind up carrying a few pills around loose — without any instructions at all.
 
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July 30, 2014 | WNYC · In the last 20 years, New Jersey went from having more than 20 percent of U.S. pharmaceutical manufacturing jobs to less than 10 percent. That means offices, labs and warehouses have gone dark.
 
July 30, 2014 | NPR · Sheik Humarr Khan, one of the doctors fighting to control West Africa's largest Ebola outbreak, died Tuesday in Sierra Leone. He was 39.
 

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July 29, 2014 | KERA · After caring for Ebola patients for several months in West Africa, Dr. Kent Brantly noticed last week that he had symptoms. The 33-year-old immediately put himself into a Liberian isolation ward.
 
July 29, 2014 | NPR · Virologist Thomas Geisbert has spent decades studying Ebola and other hemorrhagic fevers. He speaks to Audie Cornish about the current Ebola outbreak, the worst in history, and how it might be contained this time around.
 
July 29, 2014 | NPR · The Eid festival, which celebrates the end of Ramadan, serves as a time for visiting relatives and exchanging gifts. But one family's holiday in Gaza traces the death and displacement wrought by the war between Hamas and Israel.
 

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July 26, 2014 | NPR · Hezbollah has been a longtime ally of Hamas, but during this most recent conflict between Israel and Gaza they've taken a sideline role. NPR's Scott Simon talks to the BBC's Kim Ghattas in Beirut.
 

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July 27, 2014 | NPR · Fighting in Ukraine near the crash site of Malaysia Airlines Flight MH17 has international investigators staying away. NPR's Arun Rath talks with OSCE's Michael Bociurkiw about the investigation.
 

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Antislavery movements

Feb 10, 2009 — Every generation of Americans reinvents Abraham Lincoln in its own image. Among the crush of recent Lincoln books, these three help us understand his personality, power and relationship to his times.
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Jan 4, 2008 — Ryan Jordan, author of Slavery and the Meetinghouse: The Quakers and the Abolitionist Dilemma, explains the role of Quakers in the abolition of slavery. We also hear from Clinton Pettus, the Mid-Atlantic Regional Director of the American Friends Service Committee, as he discusses current projects aimed at injustices.
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May 9, 2007 — After a failed 1848 escape of slaves in Washington, D.C., divisions deepened between influential slave-owners and abolitionists. The nation's capital was swept up in controversy that would soon change the course of history.
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Mar 26, 2007 — Two hundred years ago, Great Britain outlawed the African slave trade throughout its massive empire. Events are being held all month to mark the bicentennial. Adam Hochschild, author of Bury the Chains: Prophets and Rebels in the Fight to Free an Empire's Slaves, offers his insights.
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Feb 17, 2007 — The slave trade was abolished in the British colonies 200 years ago this year. The film Amazing Grace commemorates the event. Writer Adam Hochschild discusses the birth of the abolitionist movement in Great Britain.
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Dec 22, 2005Fresh Air book critic Maureen Corrigan lists her favorite books of 2005, including novels by Mary Gaitskill and Kazuo Ishiguro, and memoirs by Joan Didion and J.R. Moehringer.
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Jul 13, 2005 — Author Adam Hochschild works with a clear cast of villains and heroes in this history of the abolitionist movement in Britain.
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May 7, 2005 — John Brown's violent campaign against slavery — punctuated by the dramatic 1859 raid at Harper's Ferry, Va. — made him a divisive figure, then and now. A new biography by David Reynolds examines the abolitionist's life and his cultural impact.
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Apr 21, 2005 — Most American history textbooks paint a romantic picture of the the Underground Railroad. A new book tells the story of a bi-racial movement animated by moral outrage, religious fervor and radical politics.
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Apr 20, 2005 — Writer David Reynolds is the author of the new biography John Brown: Abolitionist: The Man who Killed Slavery, Sparked the Civil War, and Seeded Civil Rights. Reynold's book is considered to be a sympathetic look at the man who he says framed the issue of slavery in stark, uncompromising terms.
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