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August 22, 2014 | NPR · The standoff between the U.S. and Russia over Ukraine has raised the specter of a new Cold War. David Greene talks to Julie Ioffe, of the New Republic, about what Russia's next move may be in Ukraine.
 
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August 22, 2014 | NPR · Even just the word Ebola is kind of terrifying. Why? Hollywood has a lot to do with it. But Ebola outbreaks also have all the ingredients for what one psychologist calls the "dread factor."
 
August 22, 2014 | NPR · Census Bureau data show a wider gap between rich and poor. Kelly McEvers explores this with economist Enrico Moretti of the University of California-Berkeley, author of The New Geography of Jobs.
 

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November 1, 2009 | NPR · Every weekday, All Things Considered hosts Robert Siegel, Melissa Block and Audie Cornish present the program's trademark mix of news, interviews, commentaries, reviews, and offbeat features.
 
August 21, 2014 | KWMU · The violence at night in Ferguson, Mo., has calmed down for now. However, more than 160 people have been arrested since the protests began. Police records offer a sense of who they are.
 
August 21, 2014 | NPR · The aftermath of the police shooting in Ferguson, Mo., has focused attention on police-involved killings more broadly in the U.S. But statistics on shootings by police are scarce. To learn why, Audie Cornish speaks with David Klinger, an associate professor at the University of Missouri in St. Louis.
 

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August 16, 2014 | NPR · Both Ukraine and Russia say they're trying to send supplies to residents in eastern Ukraine. But with tensions on both sides running high, that aid may take a while to arrive.
 

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August 17, 2014 | NPR · American fighter jets and drones carried out airstrikes against Islamist targets near the Mosul Dam in northern Iraq on Saturday. A breach of the dam could threaten entire cities.
 

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Mark Helprin

Sep 30, 2013 — In softcover fiction, Mark Helprin sets a romance against the backdrop of midcentury New York, and Ian Frazier presents the journals of a mother who swears an extremely blue streak. In softcover nonfiction, Yael Kohen collects an oral history of women in comedy, and Jon Ronson gathers some funny stories of his own.
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Oct 6, 2012 — Mark Helprin's sweeping midcentury novel, In Sunlight and In Shadow, describes a postwar New York in limbo. Helprin borrowed from his own experiences to write this tale of love and familial obligations. "It's all based on what I know and what I knew," he says.
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Sep 26, 2012 — When aspiring Broadway actress Catherine and World War II vet Harry first lock eyes on the Staten Island Ferry, everything changes — but their lives together won't be easy. Mark Helprin delivers an old-fashioned love story, and an ode to 1940s New York, in his novel In Sunlight and in Shadow.
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Sep 19, 2012 — Author Mark Helprin's latest novel is a sprawling tale of love, honor and danger in the years just after World War II. Returned soldier Harry Copeland spots a mysterious woman in white on the Staten Island Ferry. She turns out to be an heiress with Broadway dreams and a complicated past that threatens their growing love.
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Apr 26, 2009 — Two years ago, author Mark Helprin's op-ed urging the extension of copyright protection inspired a huge online backlash. A new book is his response to the uproar, but opponents are still having their say.
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Nov 6, 2004 — Mark Helprin's fiction has appeared in The New Yorker for more than 20 years. He's also a contributing editor for The Wall Street Journal. NPR's Scott Simon talks with Helprin about his latest collection of short stories.
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