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August 21, 2014 | NPR · The attorney general hugged community leaders, a highway patrol captain and the mother of Michael Brown during his visit, and got an update on the federal investigation into the teen's shooting.
 
August 21, 2014 | NPR · At McCluer High School, 30 varsity football players — all black, mostly from Ferguson — practice. David Greene talks to Sports Illustrated writer Robert Klemko about his story, "Football in Ferguson."
 
August 21, 2014 | NPR · Kelly McEvers talks to Syria expert Shashank Joshi, about President Bashar al-Assad's tenacious grip on power. Joshi is with the Royal Services Institute in London.
 

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August 20, 2014 | NPR · Demonstrators want an indictment of the police officer who fatally shot Michael Brown earlier this month. But investigations — one of them a federal civil rights case — can take weeks, if not months.
 
August 20, 2014 | NPR · More than a week now from the police shooting in Ferguson, Mo., it's worth asking: Ideally, what should happen with a police officer stops someone in the street?
 
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August 20, 2014 | NPR · Enlisting has been a rite of passage for men in the Pierce family since the Civil War. And as America has changed, Mark Pierce and his son Jeremy explain, what it means to serve has, too.
 

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August 16, 2014 | NPR · Both Ukraine and Russia say they're trying to send supplies to residents in eastern Ukraine. But with tensions on both sides running high, that aid may take a while to arrive.
 

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August 17, 2014 | NPR · American fighter jets and drones carried out airstrikes against Islamist targets near the Mosul Dam in northern Iraq on Saturday. A breach of the dam could threaten entire cities.
 

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Human rights workers

Mar 29, 2013 — More than 20 years ago, Dr. Hawa Abdi set out to change her broken society when she turned her 1,300-acre farmland outside Mogadishu into a camp for 90,000 internally displaced Somalis. Now she calls it Hawa Village — and it includes a hospital, school and farm.
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Sep 8, 2011 — Over the past few weeks, Talk of the Nation has been asking for the books you think should be required reading for all college freshmen. Here are 10 of your suggestions.
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Oct 9, 2007 — In a new memoir, Jimmy Carter writes about his post-presidential life and his peacemaking efforts worldwide. Carter says the last 25 years could not have been more unpredictable or more gratifying.
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Apr 10, 2006 — As genocide ravaged Rwanda in 1994, hotel manager Paul Rusesabagina risked his own life to save the lives of over 1,000 people. He used diplomacy, flattery, and even deceit as he worked to keep people alive. Rusesabagina tells his story, which inspired the film Hotel Rwanda.
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Apr 6, 2006 — Twelve years ago, Hutu militias began a slaughter in Rwanda that left at least 800,000 people dead. Paul Rusesabagina, whose story inspired Hotel Rwanda, talks about his new memoir and the legacy of African colonialism.
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Jun 18, 2005 — Author Philip Caputo's latest novel, 'Acts of Faith', depicts the effects of the Sudanese civil war on relief workers and missionaries. He notes that sometimes characters with altruistic intentions end up causing great harm.
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May 19, 2005 — Journalist and novelist Philip Caputo's new novel, Acts of Faith, is set in Sudan during that country's civil war. It depicts the consequences — intended and otherwise — the conflict has on aid workers and missionaries involved in relief work.
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Apr 2, 2005 — Novelist Francine Prose talks about her humorous new novel A Changed Man, in which a neo-Nazi goes to work for a human rights organization run by a Holocaust survivor. None of the characters are free from Prose's comic barbs.
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