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April 18, 2014 | NPR · The agreement calls on all parties to refrain from violence, requires that illegally-armed groups disarm and that control of government buildings be returned to Ukrainian authorities.
 
April 18, 2014 | NPR · President Obama said enrollment under the Affordable Care Act reached 8 million after the deadline was extended by 2 weeks. The figure represents a turnaround from the disastrous debut of the website.
 
April 18, 2014 | NPR · Morning Edition spent a lot of time recently reporting from the U.S.-Mexico border. President Obama has deported 2 million people from the U.S. But many say that number is misleading.
 

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April 19, 2014 | NPR · The military's training center at Fort Irwin in California is complete with mock Middle Eastern villages. But as the U.S. combat mission in Afghanistan winds down, how will this facility change?
 
April 19, 2014 | NPR · In the Ukrainian city of Donetsk, the opposing camps seem increasingly entrenched, despite a diplomatic effort to ease tensions. Pro-Russian forces refuse to leave occupied buildings and public squares in the east. It's an uneasy Easter weekend and neither side is willing to budge.
 
April 19, 2014 | NPR · Russia is in the middle of a planned upgrade and expansion of its military forces, but global affairs professor Mark Galeotti tells NPR's Arun Rath that Russia's military has its limits.
 

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April 19, 2014 | NPR · The search continues for hundreds of people, mostly students, who were on board a South Korean ferry when it sank this week. Correspondent Anthony Kuhn shares the latest with NPR's Wade Goodwyn.
 

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April 13, 2014 | NPR · As the anniversary of last year's marathon bombing approaches, NPR's Rachel Martin speaks with correspondent Carrie Johnson about the investigation and legal wrangling yet to come.
 

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Human rights workers

Mar 29, 2013 — More than 20 years ago, Dr. Hawa Abdi set out to change her broken society when she turned her 1,300-acre farmland outside Mogadishu into a camp for 90,000 internally displaced Somalis. Now she calls it Hawa Village — and it includes a hospital, school and farm.
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Sep 8, 2011 — Over the past few weeks, Talk of the Nation has been asking for the books you think should be required reading for all college freshmen. Here are 10 of your suggestions.
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Oct 9, 2007 — In a new memoir, Jimmy Carter writes about his post-presidential life and his peacemaking efforts worldwide. Carter says the last 25 years could not have been more unpredictable or more gratifying.
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Apr 10, 2006 — As genocide ravaged Rwanda in 1994, hotel manager Paul Rusesabagina risked his own life to save the lives of over 1,000 people. He used diplomacy, flattery, and even deceit as he worked to keep people alive. Rusesabagina tells his story, which inspired the film Hotel Rwanda.
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Apr 6, 2006 — Twelve years ago, Hutu militias began a slaughter in Rwanda that left at least 800,000 people dead. Paul Rusesabagina, whose story inspired Hotel Rwanda, talks about his new memoir and the legacy of African colonialism.
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Jun 18, 2005 — Author Philip Caputo's latest novel, 'Acts of Faith', depicts the effects of the Sudanese civil war on relief workers and missionaries. He notes that sometimes characters with altruistic intentions end up causing great harm.
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May 19, 2005 — Journalist and novelist Philip Caputo's new novel, Acts of Faith, is set in Sudan during that country's civil war. It depicts the consequences — intended and otherwise — the conflict has on aid workers and missionaries involved in relief work.
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Apr 2, 2005 — Novelist Francine Prose talks about her humorous new novel A Changed Man, in which a neo-Nazi goes to work for a human rights organization run by a Holocaust survivor. None of the characters are free from Prose's comic barbs.
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