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August 28, 2014 | NPR · For the first time, researchers have tracked the spread of Ebola, almost in real time, during an outbreak. The virus is quickly changing its DNA. But it's still unclear what these mutations mean.
 
August 29, 2014 | NPR · French President Francois Hollande is under pressure to fix the country's economy, which is overburdened by regulation and failing a generation of young people. He's also facing calls for austerity.
 
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August 29, 2014 | NPR · Congressman and former Republican vice presidential nominee Paul Ryan discusses his new book, The Way Forward: Renewing the American Idea.
 

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August 28, 2014 | NPR · The pay is generous — $1,000 a month. The risks are enormous. They collect the body of an Ebola victim, avoiding any contact that could infect them. They wear safety garb. And they pray.
 
August 28, 2014 | NPR · The Syrian civil war has flared up in the south of the country, near the Israeli border. A group of Islamist fighters have now captured a border crossing between Syria and Israel on the Golan Heights.
 
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August 28, 2014 | NPR · The protests following Michael Brown's death have rekindled long-standing complaints about racist policing in the St. Louis area. Cops there are now becoming more outspoken in their own defense.
 

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August 23, 2014 | NPR · Nearly 1,500 people have died in the Ebola outbreak, and more nations in the region are closing their borders. NPR's Scott Simon speaks to Africa correspondent Ofeibea Quist-Arcton about the epidemic.
 

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August 24, 2014 | NPR · In the wake of violent clashes between protesters and police in Ferguson, Mo., President Obama is ordering a review of the federal programs that help local police departments purchase military gear.
 

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Women prisoners

Mar 7, 2014 — Piper Kerman's TV tie-in prison memoir, Orange is the New Black, has hit half a year on the list.
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Oct 24, 2013 — The Orange Is The New Black author says that cooking behind bars allowed her to bond with fellow inmates, and points out where her experiences, and those depicted in the hit Netflix series, differ.
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Sep 6, 2013 — Piper Kerman's Orange Is The New Black, a memoir that inspired a Netflix series, rises to No. 1.
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Aug 12, 2013 — When she was 24, Piper Kerman dated a woman who was part of a drug smuggling ring. Years later, after being named as part of that ring, Kerman served time in a federal prison and at one point shared a cell with her former girlfriend. Her memoir of that experience inspired the Netflix series.
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Jul 17, 2011 — NPR coverage of Channeling Mark Twain by Carol Muske-Dukes. News, author interviews, critics' picks and more.
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Apr 6, 2010 — Piper Kerman was bored with her middle class life — so she joined a group of artists-turned-drug smugglers. Her memoir, Orange Is The New Black: My Year In A Women's Prison, recounts her exotic life in the drug trade, her attempt to leave it behind, and her experience serving time with other women from all walks of life.
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Jul 5, 2007 — Carol Muske-Dukes has written three novels and seven collections of poetry, been a National Book Award finalist and received a Guggenheim fellowship. Her latest novel is Channeling Mark Twain, which fellow author Mary Karr describes as "a riveting story about women in prison, with language that scorches the page and characters you won't be able to live without."
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Jan 12, 2006 — The latest novel from Sigrid Nunez, The Last of Her Kind, tracks a woman's life from her college days in the late 1960s to the present. As she describes her own life, the narrator, Georgette, also details the legacy of fierce idealism — and violence.
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Dec 9, 2004 — After more than 30 years of controversy, New York state lawmakers voted Tuesday to soften the so-called Rockefeller drug laws, reducing minimum mandatory sentence for drug convictions. The modified rules allow more than 400 inmates now serving lengthy sentences to appeal their cases. Among those applauding the change is Elaine Bartlett, who as a young mother of four was sentenced to 20 years in prison under the Rockefeller laws. NPR's Tavis Smiley speaks with Bartlett, investigative reporter Jennifer Gonnerman and New York City special narcotics prosecutor Bridgett Brennan.
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