Latest News from NPR

on:

NCPR is supported by:

 
Hourly Newscast
4 min., 45 sec.

Programs

Latest program rundown

Coming up:

Latest Features:
April 15, 2014 | NPR · The acting Ukrainian president says his military is advancing against pro-Russian separatists who took over government buildings in eastern Ukraine. The separatists didn't comply with an ultimatum.
 
April 15, 2014 | NPR · As part of NPR's anniversary coverage of the Boston Marathon bombing, Morning Edition co-host David Greene talks to Mass. Gov. Deval Patrick about that day.
 
Courtesy photo
April 15, 2014 | NPR · The bloody 1989 crackdown in Beijing changed China, NPR's Louisa Lim explains in a new book. She also chronicles the brutal repression that took place in another city — and remained hidden until now.
 

Latest program rundown

Coming up:

Latest Features:
April 15, 2014 | NPR · One year has passed since bombs rocked the finish line of the Boston Marathon. The city honored victims of the tragedy Tuesday with a tribute, including speeches from three of the victims themselves.
 
Courtesy of Carol Downing
April 15, 2014 | WBUR · At last year's Boston Marathon, Carol Downing was just half a mile from the finish line when bombs exploded and injured two of her daughters. This year, she's returning to complete the race.
 
April 15, 2014 | NPR · Each April, the shad come back to the Delaware River to spawn, and thousands of anglers in New Jersey and Pennsylvania eagerly await them. Celebrating their annual return is a local spring tradition.
 

Latest Saturday rundown




WE Saturday Feature

AP
April 12, 2014 | NPR · As pro-Russia demonstrators continue their tense standoff in Eastern Ukraine, police are conspicuously absent from city streets.
 

Latest Sunday rundown


WE Sunday Feature

April 13, 2014 | NPR · As the anniversary of last year's marathon bombing approaches, NPR's Rachel Martin speaks with correspondent Carrie Johnson about the investigation and legal wrangling yet to come.
 

Latest program rundown

Coming up:

calories

Feb 20, 2013 — Scientists say the time-honored calorie is too flawed to give people a good measure of what they're eating. But many nutritionists say calories are still the most useful tool for keeping tabs on food intake and maintaining healthy weight.
Comments |
Nov 16, 2012 — Despite the perception that Americans are a bunch of boozers, a new study shows men in their 20s and 30s take in about 175 calories a day in alcohol; for women, it's about 60 calories. Still, the government warns, it's a little more than we should be imbibing on a daily basis.
Launch in player | Comments |
Aug 3, 2012 — New research shows that official calorie counts for almonds may be off by as much as 20 percent because of the way we digest them. That may be good news people watching their weight who want to incorporate more almonds in their diet.
Comments |
Jul 23, 2012 — It may be easy to order food online, but it's also more pricey and more calorific compared to traditional ways of ordering, says a new study. It seems we lose our personal inhibitions when we don't have to talk to the seller or see other customers.
Comments |
Apr 12, 2012 — Children and teens are going to have to cut calories or get a lot more exercise to stop the obesity trend, new research says.
Comments |
Feb 24, 2012 — Is that veggie pizza at the local pizza chain 1,680 calories, or 2,960? Fast-food menus with calorie counts that are supposed to help eaters make healthier choices often aren't much help, a new study reports.
Comments |
Aug 3, 2011 — In the first hour of Talk of the Nation, the political junkie looks at the winners and losers in the debt deal, and MTV turns 30. In the second hour, how calorie counts may or may not affect the way we eat, and the link between high temperatures and crime rates.
Comments |
Jul 19, 2011 — Despite restaurant chains offering healthier menu options, they still push oversized and fattening food items to Americans. The Center for Science in the Public Interest gave awards to what it calls the worst offenders.
Comments |
more calories from NPR