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July 31, 2014 | NPR · In Gaza, the price of drinking water has soared, there's little electricity — and another shortage is beginning: people displaced by the fighting are waiting in long lines to get food.
 
July 31, 2014 | NPR · Christian Science Monitor reporter Christa Case Bryant tells Renee Montagne why the Israeli army is finding Hamas a more formidable foe now than during the 2009 war.
 
July 31, 2014 | NPR · Oklahoma is experiencing more earthquakes, and some scientists say they're caused by wastewater disposal wells. Linda Wertheimer learns more from energy reporter Joe Wertz of StateImpact Oklahoma.
 

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July 30, 2014 | NPR · An explosion rocked a crowded Gaza market during what was expected to be a lull in the fighting. Earlier in the day a United Nations school was hit by what U.N. officials say was Israeli artillery fire, killing at least 15 people. Meanwhile, rocket fire from Gaza continues to be fired into Israel.
 
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July 30, 2014 | NPR · Hamas militants are using tunnels in and out of Gaza to strike inside Israel. Israelis are questioning how the tunnels grew to be so complex and why the military hasn't been able to shut them down.
 
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July 30, 2014 | NPR · A food blogger says dozens of distilleries are buying rye whiskey from a factory in Indiana and using it in bottles labeled "artisan."
 

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July 26, 2014 | NPR · Hezbollah has been a longtime ally of Hamas, but during this most recent conflict between Israel and Gaza they've taken a sideline role. NPR's Scott Simon talks to the BBC's Kim Ghattas in Beirut.
 

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July 27, 2014 | NPR · Fighting in Ukraine near the crash site of Malaysia Airlines Flight MH17 has international investigators staying away. NPR's Arun Rath talks with OSCE's Michael Bociurkiw about the investigation.
 

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osteoporosis

Oct 12, 2013 — A review of clinical trials using vitamin D to build bone density in middle-aged women finds that it doesn't help. That may be because those women aren't generally low on calcium and that D helps the body absorb calcium in the gut only if it's seriously lacking. It may do more good in the elderly.
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Sep 25, 2013 — Many older women get bone scans every two years to look for signs of osteoporosis. But for the vast majority of people, the repeat scans don't detect significant changes. New research suggests it may make sense to stop or slow down on the scans after people have had an initial test.
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Feb 25, 2013 — There's no evidence that calcium supplements help prevent bone fractures in most people, a preventive services task force says. And calcium supplements boost the risk of kidney stones, and perhaps heart disease.
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Aug 13, 2012 — Calcium has been touted to stave off osteoporosis and promote bone health. But new research suggests going overboard on calcium consumption could lead to kidney stones or even a heart attack.
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Jun 21, 2012 — Our evolutionary history is inscribed on our very skin. The explanation for why diverse skin colors evolved over time makes not only for good anthropology, but also for applied knowledge that may help us keep intact our Vitamin D health.
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Jan 18, 2012 — Many older women currently get scans every two years to check for signs of osteoporosis, a bone-thinning disease that can cause painful spine fractures and broken hips. But a new study suggests perhaps half of women over 67 might not need such bone scans more often than every 15 years.
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Jul 21, 2011 — Some research suggests there may be an increased risk of esophageal cancer for people who take some popular osteoporosis medicines. The Food and Drug Administration is reviewing the data but says there isn't enough information to draw a firm conclusion.
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