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August 19, 2014 | NPR · More than one week after the shooting death of an unarmed black teenager in a St. Louis suburb, protests continue. On Monday night, police fired tear gas and stun grenades to disperse demonstrators.
 
August 19, 2014 | NPR · The actions in Ferguson, Mo., have inspired talk about the militarization of U.S. police departments. The real question, is whether police have become militarized in their attitude toward the public.
 
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August 19, 2014 | KHN · Across the U.S., jails hold many more people with serious mental illness than state hospitals do. San Antonio is reweaving its safety net for the mentally ill — and saving $10 million annually.
 

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Courtesy of Doctors Without Borders
August 19, 2014 | NPR · Dr. Joanne Liu of Doctors Without Borders says fear and a lack of sense of urgency has kept the international community in their home countries rather than stepping up to the plate in West Africa.
 
Leif Parsons for NPR
August 19, 2014 | NPR · The type of Ebola erupting in West Africa is closely related to one found 2,500 miles away — the distance between Boston and San Francisco. How did the virus spread so far without anyone noticing?
 
August 19, 2014 | NPR · Iranian poet and women's rights advocate Simin Behbahani has died. Her work probed the social and political challenges that faced Iran after its Islamic Revolution. She was 87.
 

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August 16, 2014 | NPR · Both Ukraine and Russia say they're trying to send supplies to residents in eastern Ukraine. But with tensions on both sides running high, that aid may take a while to arrive.
 

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August 17, 2014 | NPR · American fighter jets and drones carried out airstrikes against Islamist targets near the Mosul Dam in northern Iraq on Saturday. A breach of the dam could threaten entire cities.
 

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rural America

Aug 10, 2014 — There's no licensed plumber in Jackman, Maine. So one family is offering a $2,000 scholarship to a local student or former graduate willing to get licensed as a plumber and return to work there.
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Jul 31, 2014 — The Institute of Medicine this week urged Congress to allocate to community clinics more of the $15 billion it spends annually on training new doctors. But hospitals say that's the wrong prescription.
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May 28, 2014 — Financial problems have led many hospitals to shut down completely. Georgia is issuing licenses to rural hospitals that would allow them to become nothing more than free-standing emergency rooms.
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Feb 3, 2014 — Some farming communities are struggling to find enough contestants for the pageants that crown monarchs like the Asparagus Queen and Beef Queen. So they are relaxing the pageant rules to spice up the competition.
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Nov 20, 2012 — With pumpkin or pumpkin spices going into more products every year, we wondered, what's the deal with the pumpkin obsession? Turns out pumpkins have been a symbol of Americans' longing for simpler, rural times since we began moving to the cities in the 19th century. And marketers know it.
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Feb 2, 2012 — Instead of offering big salaries and other perks, the CEO of tiny Ashland Health Clinic, in southwest Kansas, lures physicians with "a job that matters." In addition to meeting a real need on a daily basis in Ashland, doctors also get eight weeks off to do missionary work overseas.
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Aug 14, 2011 — For many people in rural America, post offices aren't just a necessity or a convenience. They are community centers, gathering places, and a sign that they are represented. A cool visualization shows how post offices expanded throughout the country.
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Aug 11, 2011 — In the first hour of Talk of the Nation, making decisions during a deficit, and actor Martin Clunes talks about his series, Doc Martin. In second hour, what's changing in rural America, and hikers recount the tragedy on Grand Teton.
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