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July 29, 2014 | NPR · House and Senate negotiators reached a compromise, $17 billion agreement to improve medical care for veterans. The deal comes in the final week before Congress leaves town for a monthlong recess.
 
July 29, 2014 | NPR · Washington Post reporter Liz Sly tells Renee Montagne that U.S. arms may be flowing to moderate Syrian rebels, but the aid seems to be too little too late to affect the course of the civil war.
 
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July 28, 2014 | NPR · The militant group threatens to kill parents who immunize their children. As a result, polio has come roaring back in Pakistan. Eradication now hinges on whether the country can control the virus.
 

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July 28, 2014 | NPR · A new salvo has been fired in the fight over teacher tenure. A group led by former TV anchor Campbell Brown filed a complaint in New York state court, arguing that tenure laws are preventing the state from providing every child with the "sound, basic education" its constitution guarantees.
 
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July 28, 2014 | NPR · Why are so many low-income and minority kids getting second-class educations in the U.S.? That question is at the center of the heated debate about tenure protections and who gets them.
 
July 28, 2014 | NPR · Only one movie in July, Transformers: Age of Extinction, has broken the 100 million mark during its opening weekend. Box office receipts all summer have proven anemic. Paul Dergarabedian, a senior media analyst with RENTRAK, talks to Audie Cornish about the box office slump.
 

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July 26, 2014 | NPR · Hezbollah has been a longtime ally of Hamas, but during this most recent conflict between Israel and Gaza they've taken a sideline role. NPR's Scott Simon talks to the BBC's Kim Ghattas in Beirut.
 

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July 27, 2014 | NPR · Fighting in Ukraine near the crash site of Malaysia Airlines Flight MH17 has international investigators staying away. NPR's Arun Rath talks with OSCE's Michael Bociurkiw about the investigation.
 

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medical ethics

Apr 30, 2014 — Of the 32 states that currently allow capital punishment, all rely on lethal injection as the means. Seventeen of them require a doctor to be present during the injection.
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Apr 16, 2014 — A new study adds to growing evidence that free drug samples influence doctors' prescribing habits. The cost difference to patients can be hundreds of dollars per office visit.
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Feb 19, 2014 — People with severe injuries tend to fare much better at specialized trauma centers than in typical emergency rooms. But a study suggests less equipped hospitals are hanging on to patients who can pay.
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Dec 14, 2013 — At the dawn of managed care, worried patients wanted to know whether their doctors were getting paid more to do less. Now, as many doctors' salaries depend on how many procedures they perform, patients want to know whether their doctors are paid more to do more.
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Nov 4, 2013 — Scientists are asking people to contribute samples of their gut microbes to help figure out how those microbes affect human health. But ethicists say sharing that information, as well as the personal health data that make it useful to researchers, poses risks. That's especially true for children.
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Feb 17, 2012 — A small group has gathered at the World Health Organization in Geneva to discuss a controversy over experiments that generated genetically altered viruses. After the meeting, which ends Friday, the WHO will announce what happened behind closed doors.
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Feb 16, 2012 — The highly-anticipated gathering of flu experts has been described as a fact-finding session that will focus on understanding how bird flu studies done at Erasmus Medical Center in the Netherlands and at the University of Wisconsin were performed and overseen by the relevant authorities.
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Dec 15, 2011 — Are chimpanzees necessary for biomedical research in the U.S.? Considering today's long-awaited report on this question from the National Academies, anthropologist Barbara J. King suggests the answer is "no," and that "biomedical apes" deserve retirement.
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Dec 15, 2011 — Following an expert panel's recommendations, The National Institutes of Health announced it will not issue new awards for experiments using chimps until a new set of strict criteria is in place. The panel also recommended setting up an independent oversight committee that includes members of the public.
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Oct 12, 2011 — Researchers found conflicts of interest were prevalent among experts who served on 14 U.S. and Canadian panels that came up with guidelines for the treatment of diabetes and high cholesterol between 2000 and 2010.
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