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August 27, 2014 | NPR · The report said it couldn't be proven that anyone had died because of wait times at the medical center in Phoenix. On Tuesday, President Obama pledged to do better by vets and announced initiatives.
 
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August 27, 2014 | SCPR · The Los Angeles Unified School District has shut down a half-a-billion-dollar deal with Apple and Pearson to provide classroom technology. Here's what happened.
 
August 27, 2014 | NPR · Schools in Napa Valley are to reopen Wednesday after the area's worst earthquake in decades. Hundreds of buildings and homes were damaged and a lot of rebuilding work remains to be done.
 

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August 27, 2014 | NPR · The end of August heralds the start to the final phase of the 2014 election season. As primaries wrap up and candidates ready themselves for November, NPR's Charlie Mahtesian lays out the political landscape.
 
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August 27, 2014 | NPR · Across the nation, state legislators are gearing up for Election Day. And they're well aware that their fates could be tied to national political forces like the president's low approval rating.
 
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August 27, 2014 | NPR · Irn Bru is a neon orange soda that inspires passion and may help explain the strong independent streak in Scotland as it prepares to vote Sept. 18 on whether to break away from the United Kingdom.
 

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August 23, 2014 | NPR · Nearly 1,500 people have died in the Ebola outbreak, and more nations in the region are closing their borders. NPR's Scott Simon speaks to Africa correspondent Ofeibea Quist-Arcton about the epidemic.
 

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August 24, 2014 | NPR · In the wake of violent clashes between protesters and police in Ferguson, Mo., President Obama is ordering a review of the federal programs that help local police departments purchase military gear.
 

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Ombudsman - Featured Posts

Aug 21, 2014 — An admission by a Los Angeles driver to buzzing bicyclists is purposefully left to stand on its own.
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Aug 16, 2014 — A story failed to report a CIA link but was not as misguided as Glenn Greenwald claims.
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Aug 14, 2014 — Complaints over a Houston Obamacare piece illustrate a link between editorial guidance and trust.
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Aug 8, 2014 — Some males question whether NPR values men's positions — and lives — as much as women's.
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Jun 30, 2014 — The demise of the show dedicated to diversity has provoked listener concerns and internal responses. How's NPR doing? Depends on your measure. Here's a look at the numbers.
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Mar 19, 2014 — An investigation into how NPR should refer to the Washington team concludes that it is time to pull back on using the team's name. Does anyone believe it won't be toast anyway?
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Sep 16, 2013 — Images on Al Jazeera of brutalized Americans in Iraq understandably still trouble some listeners, but NPR's acceptance of sponsorship support from the new Al Jazeera America fall well within free speech and ethical standards. Al Jazeera itself brings a valuable international voice into our living rooms.
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Sep 6, 2013 — Republicans invented the term "Obamacare" as a way to denigrate the Affordable Care Act. NPR's hosts and reporters now commonly use the term, prompting the ire of some listeners. Is NPR "letting Fox drive the narrative," as one wrote?
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Aug 14, 2013 — Here are some preliminary responses to your comments on the ombudsman process, on sourcing and on the length of my review of an NPR investigation into foster care for Native American children in South Dakota. Many of you wondered what NPR should do next. That is not for me to say, but one officer from the Native American Journalists Association has a suggestion. I also answer a grandmother quoted in the series who called me with a concern about truth.
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Aug 9, 2013 — An NPR investigation into foster care for American Indian children in South Dakota took on a serious issue but failed in several crucial respects. The series alleged that state social workers took children from their families as a way to get federal funds and put them in white homes out of cultural bias. While acknowledging secondary problems, editors defend the series, which won prizes. I find, however, that it violated NPR's standards because it lacked proof and failed to give the state's side on key points. The series also was characterized by an unfair tone, factual errors, misleading data and inadequate context. It should not have aired as it was. This introduction summarizes a six-chapter report on how not to do investigative storytelling.
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