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July 30, 2014 | KQED · Adding a translation to the English label would require bigger bottles, pharmacists say. They worry patients would wind up carrying a few pills around loose — without any instructions at all.
 
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July 30, 2014 | WNYC · In the past 20 years, New Jersey went from having more than 20 percent of U.S. pharmaceutical manufacturing jobs to less than 10 percent. That means offices, labs and warehouses have gone dark.
 
July 30, 2014 | NPR · Sheik Humarr Khan, one of the doctors fighting to control West Africa's largest Ebola outbreak, died Tuesday in Sierra Leone. He was 39.
 

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July 30, 2014 | NPR · An explosion rocked a crowded Gaza market during what was expected to be a lull in the fighting. Earlier in the day a United Nations school was hit by what U.N. officials say was Israeli artillery fire, killing at least 15 people. Meanwhile, rocket fire from Gaza continues to be fired into Israel.
 
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July 30, 2014 | NPR · Hamas militants are using tunnels in and out of Gaza to strike inside Israel. Israelis are questioning how the tunnels grew to be so complex and why the military hasn't been able to shut them down.
 
July 30, 2014 | NPR · In London, a matinee ticket for Matilda costs about $60; in New York, it's $137. What's going on? The West End has weaker unions and subsidized theater, while Broadway has amenities.
 

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July 26, 2014 | NPR · Hezbollah has been a longtime ally of Hamas, but during this most recent conflict between Israel and Gaza they've taken a sideline role. NPR's Scott Simon talks to the BBC's Kim Ghattas in Beirut.
 

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July 27, 2014 | NPR · Fighting in Ukraine near the crash site of Malaysia Airlines Flight MH17 has international investigators staying away. NPR's Arun Rath talks with OSCE's Michael Bociurkiw about the investigation.
 

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apples

Oct 31, 2013 — A Halloween apple was once a powerful symbol of fertility and immortality. In Europe and the early years of America, girls used apples and apple peels to divine their romantic destiny.
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Oct 14, 2013 — Michigan is expected to bring in a record-setting apple crop this year. So how do you sort and package 2,000 Galas in a minute? Farmers have turned to the Rolls Royce of fruit processing: a robot that uses computer vision to weed out the bad apples.
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Oct 9, 2013 — Over the past six years, an estimated 130 new apple varieties have hit markets around the globe. And behind every crisp, tasty bite, there's a world of plant breeding — and decades of painful trial and error.
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Jul 12, 2013 — The FDA's proposal would set a threshold of 10 parts per billion for inorganic arsenic in apple juice — the same standard used for drinking water. In 2011, a pair of investigations raised alarms about the levels of inorganic arsenic, a carcinogen, in the juice.
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May 14, 2013 — The apple trees are heading for full blossom in Michigan after a disastrous 2012 crop, when only 15 percent of the apples survived. But this year's harvest is expected to rebound.
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Nov 8, 2012 — The fruit-based alcoholic drink may not yet rival beer in popularity, but sales have been increasing rapidly in the past few years. A variety of flavors and the use of fruits other than the traditional apple are helping to attract a new generation of hard cider drinkers.
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Oct 8, 2012 — American apple trees used to be big. So what made them shrink? Farmers decided to use dwarfing rootstocks.
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Oct 3, 2012 — Washington state apple growers are harvesting the second-largest crop in history, but it appears there won't be enough workers to get the fruit off the trees quickly enough. The next few weeks are when the bulk of the region's fruit is picked. The labor shortage comes as apple prices are high.
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Sep 26, 2012 — Genetically modified apples that don't go brown could become the first transgenic apple varieties approved for sale in the U.S. Scientists say they're safe to eat, but the real question is, will consumers buy them?
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Sep 17, 2012 — After a mild winter and a late-April freeze, Michigan's apple harvest was decimated. Less fruit means fewer picking jobs. It also means little to no income from apples in storage that growers rely on to get them through to next year's harvest.
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