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July 29, 2014 | NPR · House and Senate negotiators reached a compromise, $17 billion agreement to improve medical care for veterans. The deal comes in the final week before Congress leaves town for a monthlong recess.
 
July 29, 2014 | NPR · Washington Post reporter Liz Sly tells Renee Montagne that U.S. arms may be flowing to moderate Syrian rebels, but the aid seems to be too little too late to affect the course of the civil war.
 
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July 28, 2014 | NPR · The militant group threatens to kill parents who immunize their children. As a result, polio has come roaring back in Pakistan. Eradication now hinges on whether the country can control the virus.
 

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July 28, 2014 | NPR · A new salvo has been fired in the fight over teacher tenure. A group led by former TV anchor Campbell Brown filed a complaint in New York state court, arguing that tenure laws are preventing the state from providing every child with the "sound, basic education" its constitution guarantees.
 
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July 28, 2014 | NPR · Why are so many low-income and minority kids getting second-class educations in the U.S.? That question is at the center of the heated debate about tenure protections and who gets them.
 
July 28, 2014 | NPR · Only one movie in July, Transformers: Age of Extinction, has broken the 100 million mark during its opening weekend. Box office receipts all summer have proven anemic. Paul Dergarabedian, a senior media analyst with RENTRAK, talks to Audie Cornish about the box office slump.
 

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July 26, 2014 | NPR · Hezbollah has been a longtime ally of Hamas, but during this most recent conflict between Israel and Gaza they've taken a sideline role. NPR's Scott Simon talks to the BBC's Kim Ghattas in Beirut.
 

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July 27, 2014 | NPR · Fighting in Ukraine near the crash site of Malaysia Airlines Flight MH17 has international investigators staying away. NPR's Arun Rath talks with OSCE's Michael Bociurkiw about the investigation.
 

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food science

Jun 27, 2014 — A high school chemistry teacher in the U.K. started honing his visual talents by making posters for students. Now his infographics about food science and chemistry basics are a hit on the Web.
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May 23, 2014 — We love raw seafood but can't stand uncooked fowl or pork. Why? A big part of it is the effective lack of gravity in water, a scientist says. Weightlessness gives fish muscles a smooth, soft texture.
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Apr 17, 2014 — The Sichuan peppercorn that makes our mouths tingle activates the same neurons as when our foot falls asleep. Scientists are hoping the connection unlocks clues for how to turn those neurons off.
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Mar 19, 2014 — Kids seem to crave more energy and sugar than adults crave because they're growing, researchers say in a new study. They found that kids who preferred sweet flavors were tall for their age.
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Mar 13, 2014 — The California university is already famous for its wine and beer programs. Coffee seemed like a natural next step. Its new Coffee Center aims to break down the science behind the perfect cup of joe.
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Mar 12, 2014 — News media were quick to report on a $499 "Miracle Machine" that could turn water into wine. The science sounded suspect to us, with good reason. The perpetrators call it a sham for charity's sake.
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Dec 24, 2013 — A beauty product in the kitchen? Cooking gurus have been advocating this secret weapon since the 1970s to achieve crispy duck skin that will blow them away (sorry!). Here at NPR, we also used the salon appliance to make some killer s'mores.
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Dec 3, 2013 — A cookie in the oven almost looks like a monster coming alive. It bulges out, triples in size and then stiffens into a crisp biscuit. So how does an oven turn raw dough into a delight? A new animation explains the chemistry behind great baking so you, too, can unleash your inner mad scientist in the kitchen.
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Oct 9, 2013 — Over the past six years, an estimated 130 new apple varieties have hit markets around the globe. And behind every crisp, tasty bite, there's a world of plant breeding — and decades of painful trial and error.
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Oct 1, 2013 — If you've always wanted to take a course at Harvard or with America's most talented chefs, but you didn't have the money, discipline or grades, now's your chance. The best part of this free online class: You can eat your lab experiments.
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