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August 27, 2014 | NPR · The report said it couldn't be proven that anyone had died because of wait times at the medical center in Phoenix. On Tuesday, President Obama pledged to do better by vets and announced initiatives.
 
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August 27, 2014 | SCPR · The Los Angeles Unified School District has shut down a half-a-billion-dollar deal with Apple and Pearson to provide classroom technology. Here's what happened.
 
August 27, 2014 | NPR · Schools in Napa Valley are to reopen Wednesday after the area's worst earthquake in decades. Hundreds of buildings and homes were damaged and a lot of rebuilding work remains to be done.
 

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August 26, 2014 | NPR · Dr. Tom Frieden, director of the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, has arrived in West Africa to assess the Ebola outbreak. The situation in Liberia, he says, is "absolutely unprecedented."
 
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August 26, 2014 | NPR · An inquiry in the U.K. has found that more than 1,400 children have been sexually abused by an organized ring of men in the northern English town of Rotherham.
 
August 26, 2014 | NPR · Robert Siegel speaks with Stephen R. Kelly, a visiting professor at Duke University, about how North and South Carolina hope to resolve questions about the border between them. The original border, which was mandated by the British during the colonial era, was never surveyed properly. That's caused headaches ever since the 18th century.
 

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August 23, 2014 | NPR · Nearly 1,500 people have died in the Ebola outbreak, and more nations in the region are closing their borders. NPR's Scott Simon speaks to Africa correspondent Ofeibea Quist-Arcton about the epidemic.
 

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August 24, 2014 | NPR · In the wake of violent clashes between protesters and police in Ferguson, Mo., President Obama is ordering a review of the federal programs that help local police departments purchase military gear.
 

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environment

Jul 11, 2014 — Palm oil growers are setting their sights on Africa as they amp up production. More than half of the land that's been set aside for plantations in Africa overlaps with ape habitats, researchers say.
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Jun 12, 2014 — Drakes Bay Oyster Co. is resisting the expiration of its lease in Marin County, Calif. The debate may reach the Supreme Court, and it's dividing residents of the San Francisco Bay Area.
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May 8, 2014 — When crops are surrounded by high levels of carbon dioxide, they're more productive. But they may have lower concentrations of some crucial nutrients, which could increase malnutrition in the future.
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Apr 22, 2014 — On Earth Day 2014, it wasn't easy being an environmental organization in the Republican Party. The big donors who write checks aren't much interested in the environment.
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Mar 20, 2014 — The recession had caused Americans to favor the economy over the environment, but that trend reversed itself in Gallup's latest survey.
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Mar 17, 2014'Impair Ou Pair?' To combat smog, officials restricted car use Monday. For the most part, only cars with odd-numbered license plates could be on the streets. The rule will end after today.
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Jan 31, 2014 — The dredging operation is part of a plan to expand a coal port in Queensland. Environmentalists have warned that dumping sediment could kill off delicate corals, but park officials said dredging would be "subject to strict environmental conditions."
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Dec 8, 2013 — For the first time, scientists have figured out where we sit on the global food chain. Although humans are clearly top chefs of the world, we're not the top predator. Instead, our ranking is closer to a small, smelly fish that we put on pizzas and salads.
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Nov 22, 2013 — The U.S. lost an average of 80,000 acres of coastal wetlands from 2004 to 2009, according to recent government data. In a recent period, more than 70 percent of the estimated loss came in the Gulf of Mexico.
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Oct 22, 2013 — The demand for Russia's high-value timber is fueling organized crime, government corruption and illegal logging. The hardwood often ends up as flooring and furniture in the United States, Europe, Japan and China.
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