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August 1, 2014 | NPR · Renee Montagne talks with the head of the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, Dr. Thomas Frieden, for the latest news about the Ebola outbreak in West Africa.
 
August 1, 2014 | NPR · CIA director John Brennan apologized to Sen. Dianne Feinstein, who had accused the CIA of spying on her committee's computers. Brennan at first denied it.
 
August 1, 2014 | NPR · It's one of the most popular items, but often it seems to be as far as humanly possible from the entrance. The Planet Money team looks at two very different theories about why that is.
 

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July 31, 2014 | NPR · The day began with Israel's military calling up 16,000 more reservists, stoking fears of a widening offensive in Gaza; it ended with a 72-hour cease-fire agreement between Israel and Hamas.
 
July 31, 2014 | NPR · Nearly a month into the war in Gaza, pollsters have been taking a look at how attitudes in the region have changed among Israelis and Palestinians.
 
July 31, 2014 | NPR · A surge of new cases in West Africa's Ebola virus outbreak has health officials worried that the epidemic is getting worse. Sierra Leone, for one, has declared a state of emergency, sending in troops to quarantine some of the hardest hit communities.
 

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July 26, 2014 | NPR · Hezbollah has been a longtime ally of Hamas, but during this most recent conflict between Israel and Gaza they've taken a sideline role. NPR's Scott Simon talks to the BBC's Kim Ghattas in Beirut.
 

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July 27, 2014 | NPR · Fighting in Ukraine near the crash site of Malaysia Airlines Flight MH17 has international investigators staying away. NPR's Arun Rath talks with OSCE's Michael Bociurkiw about the investigation.
 

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environment

Jul 11, 2014 — Palm oil growers are setting their sights on Africa as they amp up production. More than half of the land that's been set aside for plantations in Africa overlaps with ape habitats, researchers say.
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Jun 12, 2014 — Drakes Bay Oyster Co. is resisting the expiration of its lease in Marin County, Calif. The debate may reach the Supreme Court, and it's dividing residents of the San Francisco Bay Area.
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May 8, 2014 — When crops are surrounded by high levels of carbon dioxide, they're more productive. But they may have lower concentrations of some crucial nutrients, which could increase malnutrition in the future.
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Apr 22, 2014 — On Earth Day 2014, it wasn't easy being an environmental organization in the Republican Party. The big donors who write checks aren't much interested in the environment.
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Mar 20, 2014 — The recession had caused Americans to favor the economy over the environment, but that trend reversed itself in Gallup's latest survey.
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Mar 17, 2014'Impair Ou Pair?' To combat smog, officials restricted car use Monday. For the most part, only cars with odd-numbered license plates could be on the streets. The rule will end after today.
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Jan 31, 2014 — The dredging operation is part of a plan to expand a coal port in Queensland. Environmentalists have warned that dumping sediment could kill off delicate corals, but park officials said dredging would be "subject to strict environmental conditions."
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Dec 8, 2013 — For the first time, scientists have figured out where we sit on the global food chain. Although humans are clearly top chefs of the world, we're not the top predator. Instead, our ranking is closer to a small, smelly fish that we put on pizzas and salads.
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Nov 22, 2013 — The U.S. lost an average of 80,000 acres of coastal wetlands from 2004 to 2009, according to recent government data. In a recent period, more than 70 percent of the estimated loss came in the Gulf of Mexico.
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Oct 22, 2013 — The demand for Russia's high-value timber is fueling organized crime, government corruption and illegal logging. The hardwood often ends up as flooring and furniture in the United States, Europe, Japan and China.
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