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July 30, 2014 | KQED · Adding a translation to the English label would require bigger bottles, pharmacists say. They worry patients would wind up carrying a few pills around loose — without any instructions at all.
 
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July 30, 2014 | WNYC · In the past 20 years, New Jersey went from having more than 20 percent of U.S. pharmaceutical manufacturing jobs to less than 10 percent. That means offices, labs and warehouses have gone dark.
 
July 30, 2014 | NPR · Sheik Humarr Khan, one of the doctors fighting to control West Africa's largest Ebola outbreak, died Tuesday in Sierra Leone. He was 39.
 

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July 30, 2014 | NPR · An explosion rocked a crowded Gaza market during what was expected to be a lull in the fighting. Earlier in the day a United Nations school was hit by what U.N. officials say was Israeli artillery fire, killing at least 15 people. Meanwhile, rocket fire from Gaza continues to be fired into Israel.
 
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July 30, 2014 | NPR · Hamas militants are using tunnels in and out of Gaza to strike inside Israel. Israelis are questioning how the tunnels grew to be so complex and why the military hasn't been able to shut them down.
 
July 30, 2014 | NPR · In London, a matinee ticket for Matilda costs about $60; in New York, it's $137. What's going on? The West End has weaker unions and subsidized theater, while Broadway has amenities.
 

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July 26, 2014 | NPR · Hezbollah has been a longtime ally of Hamas, but during this most recent conflict between Israel and Gaza they've taken a sideline role. NPR's Scott Simon talks to the BBC's Kim Ghattas in Beirut.
 

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July 27, 2014 | NPR · Fighting in Ukraine near the crash site of Malaysia Airlines Flight MH17 has international investigators staying away. NPR's Arun Rath talks with OSCE's Michael Bociurkiw about the investigation.
 

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Norovirus

Jun 3, 2014 — Cruise ships account for only 1 percent of reported norovirus cases, while 25 percent come from contaminated food. Sick workers at restaurants and cafeterias often spread the virus.
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Feb 7, 2014 — The Mohonk Mountain House in New Paltz, N.Y., closed Friday afternoon so that cleaning crews from a company that specializes in disaster responses can scour the place after an outbreak of intestinal illness. Norovirus appears to be the culprit.
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Jan 30, 2014 — Nearly 700 passengers and crew fell ill aboard the MS Explorer of the Seas — more people than any other cruise ship monitored by the CDC in the past two decades.
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Jan 25, 2013 — More than half of norovirus outbreaks reported during the last four months of 2012 in the U.S. were caused by a strain first identified in Australia. Restaurants and long-term care facilities have been hit hardest.
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Jan 17, 2013 — Influenza is especially intense this year, and people are flooding into hospitals and doctors' offices. But the flu is just one of a triple whammy of respiratory viruses — plus the nasty norovirus — that are making lots of people sick.
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Jan 4, 2013 — Developed by British researchers, Larry the robot has helped scientists see that a little vomit can go a long way. He vomits on command. And his barf can be tagged with fluorescent dye that makes it easy for scientists to track.
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May 9, 2012 — Norovirus particles can fly through the air, land on things like plastic bags and survive there for weeks, according to an investigation of a stomach flu outbreak in Oregon. The researchers say this proves you don't have to have direct contact with someone to get sick.
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Dec 8, 2011 — A test of a nasal vaccine against norovirus suggests it may be possible to immunize people against the virus, a common cause of foodborne illness.
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Oct 31, 2011 — A study of basketball players who caught the contagious norovirus in the locker room provides a play-by-play of how it spread. The bug is the second-most common reason players miss a game.
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more Norovirus from NPR