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July 23, 2014 | NPR · Vice President Joe Biden has been traveling the country to learn about the best ways to train workers. He announced the results Tuesday as the president signed a workforce training bill into law.
 
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July 23, 2014 | NPR · Congress is supposed to hold U.S. spy agencies accountable. But as Edward Snowden's disclosures revealed, intelligence officials have not always provided a full or accurate picture.
 
KQED
July 23, 2014 | KQED · The largest union of nurses in California starts contract negotiations Thursday with Kaiser Permanente's hospitals. Talks went smoothly four years ago, but this round will likely be more contentious.
 

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July 22, 2014 | NPR · Two weeks into the conflict in the Gaza Strip, more than 600 Palestinians — mostly civilians — and 29 Israelis have been killed. Two recent Israeli strikes, on a school and a hospital, reflect the scope of Israel's offensive.
 
July 22, 2014 | NPR · U.S. airlines have canceled flights to Israel after reports of Hamas rockets landing near Ben Gurion International Airport outside Tel Aviv.
 
July 22, 2014 | NPR · Secretary of State John Kerry has finished his first full day in Cairo, where he's trying to help forge a cease-fire between Israel and Hamas in the Gaza Strip.
 

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July 19, 2014 | NPR · NPR's Scott Simon talks with David Herzsenhorn of The New York Times about the latest developments in Ukraine, where a Malaysia Airlines passenger plane was downed on Thursday, killing 298 people.
 

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July 20, 2014 | NPR · NPR's Arun Rath gets the latest from correspondent Corey Flintoff at the site of last week's downing of a Malaysian jetliner in Eastern Ukraine.
 

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marketing

Jan 21, 2014 — Science fiction is littered with warnings of a consumerist future ruled by all-powerful corporations. Commentator and science-fiction fan Adam Frank offers up a clever song he saw on YouTube as one small defense against falling into that trap.
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Oct 21, 2013 — The federal government does not currently regulate the sales and marketing of electronic cigarettes. That may change soon, but in the meantime, the lack of regulation means manufacturers have tremendous leeway over how they advertise their products.
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Oct 11, 2013 — There are a whole slew of mind games that label designers use to get us to think better of their wines without ever tasting a sip. Want to add 10 bucks to the price of a bottle? Class it up with some gold stamping on that label. An insider spills the industry's secrets in a gorgeous photo book.
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Aug 10, 2013 — Levi's jeans made in Asia; Honda Civics made in America. What other iconic national products have pulled the old switcheroo?
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Jul 24, 2013 — Are you addicted to technology? Do you check email obsessively, tweet without restraint or post on Facebook during Thanksgiving dinner? Many techies and marketers are tapping into powerful reward mechanisms in our brain to make their products as compelling and profitable as possible.
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Mar 22, 2013 — Is "neuroscience care" a new kind of care? A new medical speciality? Or a new kind of marketing? Commentator Alva No says: don't believe the hype.
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Jul 24, 2012 — Scientists have long studied why some requests seem to be met with a yes while others get a no. Now, there's a new development: A study finds that asking for unusual favors can be very effective in getting people to comply.
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Nov 17, 2011 — In many food safety investigations, disease detectives ask people what they ate. But most people often can't remember. Enter the loyalty card database, which never forgets.
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Nov 4, 2011 — People opt for bigger food portions when they're feeling powerless, according to new research. And when they're told that tiny portions are prestigious, they go small. That may be one reason why super-sized portions are so alluring, and why waistlines are bulging.
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