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August 22, 2014 | NPR · The standoff between the U.S. and Russia over Ukraine has raised the specter of a new Cold War. David Greene talks to Julie Ioffe, of the New Republic, about what Russia's next move may be in Ukraine.
 
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August 22, 2014 | NPR · Even just the word Ebola is kind of terrifying. Why? Hollywood has a lot to do with it. But Ebola outbreaks also have all the ingredients for what one psychologist calls the "dread factor."
 
August 22, 2014 | NPR · Census Bureau data show a wider gap between rich and poor. Kelly McEvers explores this with economist Enrico Moretti of the University of California-Berkeley, author of The New Geography of Jobs.
 

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August 21, 2014 | KWMU · The violence at night in Ferguson, Mo., has calmed down for now. However, more than 160 people have been arrested since the protests began. Police records offer a sense of who they are.
 
August 21, 2014 | NPR · The aftermath of the police shooting in Ferguson, Mo., has focused attention on police-involved killings more broadly in the U.S. But statistics on shootings by police are scarce. To learn why, Audie Cornish speaks with David Klinger, an associate professor at the University of Missouri in St. Louis.
 
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August 21, 2014 | NPR · The hunt is on to identify the man in the James Foley execution video who speaks with a British accent. An estimated 2,000 Europeans have left home to join the Islamic State in Syria and Iraq.
 

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August 16, 2014 | NPR · Both Ukraine and Russia say they're trying to send supplies to residents in eastern Ukraine. But with tensions on both sides running high, that aid may take a while to arrive.
 

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August 17, 2014 | NPR · American fighter jets and drones carried out airstrikes against Islamist targets near the Mosul Dam in northern Iraq on Saturday. A breach of the dam could threaten entire cities.
 

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marketing

Jan 21, 2014 — Science fiction is littered with warnings of a consumerist future ruled by all-powerful corporations. Commentator and science-fiction fan Adam Frank offers up a clever song he saw on YouTube as one small defense against falling into that trap.
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Oct 21, 2013 — The federal government does not currently regulate the sales and marketing of electronic cigarettes. That may change soon, but in the meantime, the lack of regulation means manufacturers have tremendous leeway over how they advertise their products.
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Oct 11, 2013 — There are a whole slew of mind games that label designers use to get us to think better of their wines without ever tasting a sip. Want to add 10 bucks to the price of a bottle? Class it up with some gold stamping on that label. An insider spills the industry's secrets in a gorgeous photo book.
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Aug 10, 2013 — Levi's jeans made in Asia; Honda Civics made in America. What other iconic national products have pulled the old switcheroo?
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Jul 24, 2013 — Are you addicted to technology? Do you check email obsessively, tweet without restraint or post on Facebook during Thanksgiving dinner? Many techies and marketers are tapping into powerful reward mechanisms in our brain to make their products as compelling and profitable as possible.
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Mar 22, 2013 — Is "neuroscience care" a new kind of care? A new medical speciality? Or a new kind of marketing? Commentator Alva NoŽ says: don't believe the hype.
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Jul 24, 2012 — Scientists have long studied why some requests seem to be met with a yes while others get a no. Now, there's a new development: A study finds that asking for unusual favors can be very effective in getting people to comply.
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Nov 17, 2011 — In many food safety investigations, disease detectives ask people what they ate. But most people often can't remember. Enter the loyalty card database, which never forgets.
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Nov 4, 2011 — People opt for bigger food portions when they're feeling powerless, according to new research. And when they're told that tiny portions are prestigious, they go small. That may be one reason why super-sized portions are so alluring, and why waistlines are bulging.
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