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July 28, 2014 | NPR · Argentina says it cannot pay certain debts and will fall into default by July 31 if it can't come to an agreement with creditors. This would be Argentina's second default in 13 years.
 
July 28, 2014 | NPR · Even though Spain's economy is out of recession, youth unemployment has hit 57.7 percent. Economists say it could be years before jobs return. By then, many will have missed a decade or more of work.
 
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July 28, 2014 | NPR · To withstand their 9,300-mile migration, red knots feast on eggs from horseshoe crabs each spring in Delaware Bay. Scientists worry many crabs are starting to lay eggs before the birds can get there.
 

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July 28, 2014 | NPR · A new salvo has been fired in the fight over teacher tenure. A group led by former TV anchor Campbell Brown filed a complaint in New York state court, arguing that tenure laws are preventing the state from providing every child with the "sound, basic education" its constitution guarantees.
 
July 28, 2014 | NPR · A New York state lawsuit follows the Vergara ruling in California, challenging state teacher tenure policies. Who's next?
 
July 28, 2014 | NPR · Only one movie in July, Transformers: Age of Extinction, has broken the 100 million mark during its opening weekend. Box office receipts all summer have proven anemic. Paul Dergarabedian, a senior media analyst with RENTRAK, talks to Audie Cornish about the box office slump.
 

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July 26, 2014 | NPR · Hezbollah has been a longtime ally of Hamas, but during this most recent conflict between Israel and Gaza they've taken a sideline role. NPR's Scott Simon talks to the BBC's Kim Ghattas in Beirut.
 

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July 27, 2014 | NPR · Fighting in Ukraine near the crash site of Malaysia Airlines Flight MH17 has international investigators staying away. NPR's Arun Rath talks with OSCE's Michael Bociurkiw about the investigation.
 

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marketing

Jan 21, 2014 — Science fiction is littered with warnings of a consumerist future ruled by all-powerful corporations. Commentator and science-fiction fan Adam Frank offers up a clever song he saw on YouTube as one small defense against falling into that trap.
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Oct 21, 2013 — The federal government does not currently regulate the sales and marketing of electronic cigarettes. That may change soon, but in the meantime, the lack of regulation means manufacturers have tremendous leeway over how they advertise their products.
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Oct 11, 2013 — There are a whole slew of mind games that label designers use to get us to think better of their wines without ever tasting a sip. Want to add 10 bucks to the price of a bottle? Class it up with some gold stamping on that label. An insider spills the industry's secrets in a gorgeous photo book.
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Aug 10, 2013 — Levi's jeans made in Asia; Honda Civics made in America. What other iconic national products have pulled the old switcheroo?
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Jul 24, 2013 — Are you addicted to technology? Do you check email obsessively, tweet without restraint or post on Facebook during Thanksgiving dinner? Many techies and marketers are tapping into powerful reward mechanisms in our brain to make their products as compelling and profitable as possible.
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Mar 22, 2013 — Is "neuroscience care" a new kind of care? A new medical speciality? Or a new kind of marketing? Commentator Alva NoŽ says: don't believe the hype.
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Jul 24, 2012 — Scientists have long studied why some requests seem to be met with a yes while others get a no. Now, there's a new development: A study finds that asking for unusual favors can be very effective in getting people to comply.
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Nov 17, 2011 — In many food safety investigations, disease detectives ask people what they ate. But most people often can't remember. Enter the loyalty card database, which never forgets.
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Nov 4, 2011 — People opt for bigger food portions when they're feeling powerless, according to new research. And when they're told that tiny portions are prestigious, they go small. That may be one reason why super-sized portions are so alluring, and why waistlines are bulging.
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