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July 31, 2014 | NPR · Tens of thousands of displaced Gazans face skyrocketing prices for limited water supplies, and severely disrupted electricity service. As well, long lines are developing for staples like bread.
 
July 31, 2014 | NPR · Christian Science Monitor reporter Christa Case Bryant tells Renee Montagne why the Israeli army is finding Hamas a more formidable foe now than during the 2009 war.
 
July 31, 2014 | NPR · Oklahoma is experiencing more earthquakes, and some scientists say they're caused by wastewater disposal wells. Linda Wertheimer learns more from energy reporter Joe Wertz of StateImpact Oklahoma.
 

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July 31, 2014 | NPR · The day began with Israel's military calling up 16,000 more reservists, stoking fears of a widening offensive in Gaza; it ended with a 72-hour cease-fire agreement between Israel and Hamas.
 
July 31, 2014 | NPR · Nearly a month into the war in Gaza, pollsters have been taking a look at how attitudes in the region have changed among Israelis and Palestinians.
 
July 31, 2014 | NPR · A surge of new cases in West Africa's Ebola virus outbreak has health officials worried that the epidemic is getting worse. Sierra Leone, for one, has declared a state of emergency, sending in troops to quarantine some of the hardest hit communities.
 

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July 26, 2014 | NPR · Hezbollah has been a longtime ally of Hamas, but during this most recent conflict between Israel and Gaza they've taken a sideline role. NPR's Scott Simon talks to the BBC's Kim Ghattas in Beirut.
 

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July 27, 2014 | NPR · Fighting in Ukraine near the crash site of Malaysia Airlines Flight MH17 has international investigators staying away. NPR's Arun Rath talks with OSCE's Michael Bociurkiw about the investigation.
 

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development

Jul 31, 2014 — More young adults and teens are swapping suntanning and sightseeing for working in orphanages, building schools and teaching English abroad.
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May 28, 2014 — The worm causes a debilitating intestinal disease called schistosomiasis. And the parasite is spreading rapidly because of an economic boom along the shores of East Africa's Lake Malawi.
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Mar 21, 2014 — When girls act differently from boys, both biological and cultural factors may be at work. But which is primary, and can research on chimpanzees shed light on the answer?
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Jul 10, 2013 — Many families in rural Tajikistan spend hours each day collecting water from communal spigots or nearby rivers, where the water often isn't safe. When one village gets a new water system — and a tap in each yard — residents have more time to grow food and earn money to support their families.
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Mar 15, 2013 — The economic expansion of the so-called "Global South" is being driven by new trade and technology partnerships, according to a United Nations report. The U.N. predicts that over the next two decades, economic and political power will shift away from Europe and North America.
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Feb 28, 2013 — Three years after an earthquake destroyed much of Haiti's capital, it's clear that only a fraction of the $9 billion pledged in international relief reached the country. Most of what did arrive went to short-term relief, instead of rebuilding people's homes.
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Sep 19, 2012 — An experimental program by the Global Fund brought more than 100 million malaria treatments to people in sub-Saharan Africa last year, a panel of public health experts said on Monday. But time may have run out for the program to prove it's worth continuing as the Global Fund's budget declines.
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Nov 14, 2011 — As demand for offices and other developments has weakened, rising commodity prices have made farmland more valuable — turning some sites that were planned for buildings back into fields for crops.
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