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August 21, 2014 | NPR · The attorney general hugged community leaders, a highway patrol captain and the mother of Michael Brown during his visit, and got an update on the federal investigation into the teen's shooting.
 
August 21, 2014 | NPR · At McCluer High School, 30 varsity football players — all black, mostly from Ferguson — practice. David Greene talks to Sports Illustrated writer Robert Klemko about his story, "Football in Ferguson."
 
August 21, 2014 | NPR · Kelly McEvers talks to Syria expert Shashank Joshi, about President Bashar al-Assad's tenacious grip on power. Joshi is with the Royal Services Institute in London.
 

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KWMU
August 21, 2014 | KWMU · The violence at night in Ferguson, Mo., has calmed down for now. However, there have been more than 160 people arrested since the protests began. Police records offer a sense of who they are.
 
August 21, 2014 | NPR · The aftermath of the police shooting in Ferguson, Mo., has focused attention on police-involved killings more broadly in the U.S. But statistics on shootings by police are scarce. To learn why, Audie Cornish speaks with David Klinger, an associate professor at the University of Missouri in St. Louis.
 
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August 21, 2014 | NPR · The hunt is on to identify the man in the James Foley execution video who speaks with a British accent. An estimated 2,000 Europeans have left home to join the Islamic State in Syria and Iraq.
 

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August 16, 2014 | NPR · Both Ukraine and Russia say they're trying to send supplies to residents in eastern Ukraine. But with tensions on both sides running high, that aid may take a while to arrive.
 

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August 17, 2014 | NPR · American fighter jets and drones carried out airstrikes against Islamist targets near the Mosul Dam in northern Iraq on Saturday. A breach of the dam could threaten entire cities.
 

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scientific method

Feb 25, 2013 — Is science an unreliable partner? Commentator Tania Lombrozo admits that apparent contradictions between scientific studies, particularly those related to human health, can be unsettling. But she says that's no reason to give up on one of your most important partners in life.
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Dec 11, 2012 — What would you want in a national Pledge For Science? How would you balance out the need to keep politicians from waffling on scientific issues as diverse as evolution, climate change and vaccines while separating out issues of research from issues of policy?
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Nov 21, 2012 — Theories are the life-blood of science; but ruling them out may be harder than you think. And letting a cherished model fall on the trash heap of history is even harder, yet. Take "supersymmetry" from the world of particle physics, for example. When might we see its demise or its vindication?
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Oct 24, 2012 — Scientists often face a quandary when deciding how to communicate important results to the wider world. Commentator Tania Lombrozo asks whether delivering a forceful message to the public on issues of the day is more important than remaining true to the questioning nature of science when addressing a general audience.
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Apr 25, 2012 — Science hardly ever advances in a straight line. Recent observations casting doubt on the existence of Dark Matter force us to consider the lessons of history.
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Jan 25, 2012 — As science advances, it becomes more abstract and distant from people's everyday reality. How do we bridge the gap so that society as a whole can engage in the questions of the day, from global warming to the debate on evolution?
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Nov 16, 2011 — The hit series House can be used as a model for understanding how science works: ongoing testing of hypotheses leads to an explanation.
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