Latest News from NPR

on:

NCPR is supported by:

 
Hourly Newscast
4 min., 45 sec.

Programs

Latest program rundown

Coming up:

Latest Features:
Tommy Trenchard for NPR
August 28, 2014 | NPR · For the first time, researchers have tracked the spread of Ebola, almost in real time, during an outbreak. The virus is quickly changing its genetic code. But it's unclear what the mutations mean.
 
August 29, 2014 | NPR · French President Francois Hollande is under pressure to fix the country's economy, which is overburdened by regulation and failing a generation of young people. He's also facing calls for austerity.
 
Getty Images
August 29, 2014 | NPR · Congressman and former Republican vice presidential nominee Paul Ryan discusses his new book, The Way Forward: Renewing the American Idea.
 

Latest program rundown

Coming up:

Latest Features:
AP
August 29, 2014 | NPR · The Obama administration is considering whether to broaden its air campaign against the extremist group the Islamic State by striking targets in Syria.
 
August 29, 2014 | NPR · Regular political commentators, E.J. Dionne of The Washington Post and David Brooks of The New York Times, discuss the latest in Ukraine and the actions of ISIS in Iraq and Syria.
 
Getty Images
August 29, 2014 | NPR · An earthquake in Napa Valley this week brought back old fears for author Gustavo Arellano. In his anxiety he's revisiting the book A Crack in the Edge of the World.
 

Latest Saturday rundown




WE Saturday Feature

August 23, 2014 | NPR · Nearly 1,500 people have died in the Ebola outbreak, and more nations in the region are closing their borders. NPR's Scott Simon speaks to Africa correspondent Ofeibea Quist-Arcton about the epidemic.
 

Latest Sunday rundown


WE Sunday Feature

August 24, 2014 | NPR · In the wake of violent clashes between protesters and police in Ferguson, Mo., President Obama is ordering a review of the federal programs that help local police departments purchase military gear.
 

Latest program rundown

Coming up:

health care quality

Jul 18, 2014 — Fifteen years after a landmark report called attention to the deaths and injuries caused by medical errors, safety experts told a Senate panel that more needs to be done to protect patients.
Comments |
May 21, 2014 — Who doesn't like a contest, especially if it lets you prove that you're smarter than your peers? When doctors played a game that tests their knowledge, patients' blood pressure control improved.
Comments |
May 1, 2014 — Three out of 4 physicians say that their fellow doctors order wasteful tests or procedures at least once a week, a nationwide poll finds.
Comments |
Jan 27, 2014 — Alarms are good and necessary things in hospital care — except when there are so many that caregivers miss signals of a patient in crisis. Trying to conquer "alarm fatigue," one hospital turned off the beeps — and found that patient care actually improved.
Launch in player | Comments |
Dec 17, 2013 — Among the thousands of hospitals in the U.S., Medicare has identified 95 where elderly patients were most likely to suffer significant setbacks and another 97 hospitals where patients tended to have the smoothest recoveries.
Comments |
Nov 13, 2013 — The high prices we pay for drugs, doctors and administration are driving most of the increase in health spending. Industry consolidation and technology may help trim costs and make care safer. But a move in that direction will likely make medical care even more impersonal than it is today.
Comments |
Nov 10, 2013 — Unlike airlines, hospitals don't offer perks or first class upgrades to people who frequently visit the emergency room. In fact, patients like these often get worse customer service, like the apocryphal boy who cried, "Wolf!"
Comments |
Sep 20, 2013 — The number of people who die each year because of medical errors in hospitals may be twice as high as previously estimated. An analysis suggests that 210,000 or more people may suffer some type of preventable harm that contributes to their death.
Comments |
Sep 11, 2013 — Wondering if those glucosamine supplements will help your aching knee? Wonder no more. The nation's orthopedists list five treatments that don't do any good, and might do harm. It's part of an effort by medical societies to push for evidence-based treatments.
Comments |
Aug 27, 2013 — There's no evidence of benefit for many of the procedures surgeons subject patients to. A few hospitals are getting rid of time-honored practices, like fasting before an operation, because studies have found that patients come out stronger and happier without them. But traditions are hard to change.
Comments |
more health care quality from NPR