Latest News from NPR

on:

NCPR is supported by:

 
Hourly Newscast
4 min., 45 sec.

Programs

Latest program rundown

Coming up:

Latest Features:
July 29, 2014 | NPR · House and Senate negotiators reached a compromise, $17 billion agreement to improve medical care for veterans. The deal comes in the final week before Congress leaves town for a monthlong recess.
 
July 29, 2014 | NPR · Washington Post reporter Liz Sly tells Renee Montagne that U.S. arms may be flowing to moderate Syrian rebels, but the aid seems to be too little too late to affect the course of the civil war.
 
AFP/Getty Images
July 28, 2014 | NPR · The militant group threatens to kill parents who immunize their children. As a result, polio has come roaring back in Pakistan. Eradication now hinges on whether the country can control the virus.
 

Latest program rundown

Coming up:

Latest Features:
Courtesy of Samaritan's Purse
July 29, 2014 | KERA · After caring for Ebola patients for several months in West Africa, Dr. Kent Brantly noticed last week that he had symptoms. The 33-year-old immediately put himself into a Liberian isolation ward.
 
July 29, 2014 | NPR · Virologist Thomas Geisbert has spent decades studying Ebola and other hemorrhagic fevers. He speaks to Audie Cornish about the current Ebola outbreak, the worst in history, and how it might be contained this time around.
 
July 29, 2014 | NPR · The Eid festival, which celebrates the end of Ramadan, serves as a time for visiting relatives and exchanging gifts. But one family's holiday in Gaza traces the death and displacement wrought by the war between Hamas and Israel.
 

Latest Saturday rundown




WE Saturday Feature

July 26, 2014 | NPR · Hezbollah has been a longtime ally of Hamas, but during this most recent conflict between Israel and Gaza they've taken a sideline role. NPR's Scott Simon talks to the BBC's Kim Ghattas in Beirut.
 

Latest Sunday rundown


WE Sunday Feature

July 27, 2014 | NPR · Fighting in Ukraine near the crash site of Malaysia Airlines Flight MH17 has international investigators staying away. NPR's Arun Rath talks with OSCE's Michael Bociurkiw about the investigation.
 

Latest program rundown

Coming up:

bioethics

May 9, 2014 — "If smallpox is outlawed, only outlaws will have smallpox," says one NIH virologist. Others say keeping vials of deadly virus just invites a horrific accident or theft. WHO is about to vote — again.
Launch in player | Comments |
May 7, 2014 — DNA's instructions are written in a code of four molecular "letters," labeled A, C, T and G. For the first time, researchers have created and inserted two brand-new letters into a living cell.
Launch in player | Comments |
Apr 21, 2014 — Last year a scientist said he'd found a new form of botulinum toxin, and was keeping details secret to keep the recipe from terrorists. But other science and public health labs were shut out, too.
Launch in player | Comments |
Apr 17, 2014 — Scientists based their technique on the one used to create the sheep Dolly years ago. These cells might one day be useful in treating all sorts of diseases.
Launch in player | Comments |
Mar 27, 2014 — It's not about making designer beer. Johns Hopkins scientists and undergrads stitched together strands of yeast DNA as a step in exploring the essential genetics of various species: What makes us us?
Launch in player | Comments |
Jan 10, 2014 — If a person loses all brain function, he or she is considered legally dead. But the cases of Jahi McMath and Marlise Muņoz have shown that even though doctors can declare someone dead, families and the courts might not always agree with that definition.
Comments |
Oct 15, 2013 — Bioethicists from Johns Hopkins talked shop with members of the film and television industry. Because a good story is an accurate story, the two groups discussed how to better portray moral medical issues on screen.
Comments |
Oct 9, 2013 — Journals usually require researchers to reveal genetic sequences for a toxin that is the subject of a scientific paper. The requirement was waived for a new botulinum toxin because of security risks.
Launch in player | Comments |
Oct 2, 2013 — The fear of science run amok has been with us as long as the practice itself. But who decides what are the reasonable ethical boundaries for science? Commentator Marcelo Gleiser grabs ahold of this question and advises that blindly placing constraints on certain types of inquiry will not save us from Pandora's Box. We have to be smarter than that.
Comments |
Aug 23, 2013 — The study randomly assigns preemies to one group that will get blood transfusions when their anemia is relatively mild or another that won't get them until the anemia is severe. Researchers want to see which approach is better at reducing deaths and brain damage. Critics say the doctors haven't leveled with parents about the risks.
Comments |
more bioethics from NPR