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July 31, 2014 | NPR · Tens of thousands of displaced Gazans face skyrocketing prices for limited water supplies, and severely disrupted electricity service. As well, long lines are developing for staples like bread.
 
July 31, 2014 | NPR · Christian Science Monitor reporter Christa Case Bryant tells Renee Montagne why the Israeli army is finding Hamas a more formidable foe now than during the 2009 war.
 
July 31, 2014 | NPR · Oklahoma is experiencing more earthquakes, and some scientists say they're caused by wastewater disposal wells. Linda Wertheimer learns more from energy reporter Joe Wertz of StateImpact Oklahoma.
 

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July 31, 2014 | NPR · Israel's military has called up 16,000 more reservists, stoking fears of a widening offensive in Gaza. Aid workers are warning of a growing humanitarian crisis in the region, including a significant displaced population and a potential shortage of drinking water.
 
July 31, 2014 | NPR · Nearly a month into the war in Gaza, pollsters have been taking a look at how attitudes in the region have changed among Israelis and Palestinians.
 
July 31, 2014 | NPR · A surge of new cases in West Africa's Ebola virus outbreak has health officials worried that the epidemic is getting worse. Sierra Leone, for one, has declared a state of emergency, sending in troops to quarantine some of the hardest hit communities.
 

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July 26, 2014 | NPR · Hezbollah has been a longtime ally of Hamas, but during this most recent conflict between Israel and Gaza they've taken a sideline role. NPR's Scott Simon talks to the BBC's Kim Ghattas in Beirut.
 

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July 27, 2014 | NPR · Fighting in Ukraine near the crash site of Malaysia Airlines Flight MH17 has international investigators staying away. NPR's Arun Rath talks with OSCE's Michael Bociurkiw about the investigation.
 

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Ethiopia

Jul 26, 2014 — Dionna Fry spent last summer in Ethiopia, finding out how the locals liked a new kind of latrine that reduces the risk of disease — and can turn waste into fertilizer for a fruit tree.
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Jul 21, 2014 — Thousands of children in Ethiopia suffer from scoliosis so severe that humps grow from their backs. After two spinal surgeries, one little boy now hopes he'll be able to play soccer with his friends.
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Jul 17, 2014 — Meklit Hadero was born in Ethiopia and raised in the U.S. She's a folk-jazz artist who's been likened to Joni Mitchell. And she brings East African musicians together to share their beats.
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Feb 17, 2014 — During a flight headed to Rome from Addis Ababa on Monday, one of the pilots reportedly locked himself in the cockpit and took the passenger jet to Geneva, Switzerland, instead. Once there, he gave himself up to authorities and asked for asylum.
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Jan 1, 2014 — A baby born today in Ethiopia is three times less likely to die before age 5 than one born in 1990. This reduction in child mortality isn't due to expensive international aid but rather to an investment in bare-bones health clinics run by minimally trained community workers.
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Oct 30, 2013 — The number of polio cases globally sank to an all-time low in 2012. But outbreaks in Syria and Somalia this year are jeopardizing efforts to eradicate the virus. A recent visit to the Somali-Ethiopian border highlights just how easily polio can regain a foothold in rural, insecure communities.
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Jul 22, 2013 — Some of the worst-paid farmers in Ethiopia were able to get their bean to the specialty coffee ball and sell to top U.S. roasters like Stumptown. But it only happened after the growers got organized and attracted the attention of coffee prospectors from the U.S.
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Aug 21, 2012 — Ethiopian prime minister Meles Zenawi dies of an undisclosed illness; his leadership changed Ethiopia's economy to one of rapid growth and less food instability. He didn't tolerate political dissent and jailed reporters for life terms.
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