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July 31, 2014 | NPR · Tens of thousands of displaced Gazans face skyrocketing prices for limited water supplies, and severely disrupted electricity service. As well, long lines are developing for staples like bread.
 
July 31, 2014 | NPR · Christian Science Monitor reporter Christa Case Bryant tells Renee Montagne why the Israeli army is finding Hamas a more formidable foe now than during the 2009 war.
 
July 31, 2014 | NPR · Oklahoma is experiencing more earthquakes, and some scientists say they're caused by wastewater disposal wells. Linda Wertheimer learns more from energy reporter Joe Wertz of StateImpact Oklahoma.
 

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July 30, 2014 | NPR · An explosion rocked a crowded Gaza market during what was expected to be a lull in the fighting. Earlier in the day a United Nations school was hit by what U.N. officials say was Israeli artillery fire, killing at least 15 people. Meanwhile, rocket fire from Gaza continues to be fired into Israel.
 
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July 30, 2014 | NPR · Hamas militants are using tunnels in and out of Gaza to strike inside Israel. Israelis are questioning how the tunnels grew to be so complex and why the military hasn't been able to shut them down.
 
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July 30, 2014 | NPR · A food blogger says dozens of distilleries are buying rye whiskey from a factory in Indiana and using it in bottles labeled "artisan."
 

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July 26, 2014 | NPR · Hezbollah has been a longtime ally of Hamas, but during this most recent conflict between Israel and Gaza they've taken a sideline role. NPR's Scott Simon talks to the BBC's Kim Ghattas in Beirut.
 

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July 27, 2014 | NPR · Fighting in Ukraine near the crash site of Malaysia Airlines Flight MH17 has international investigators staying away. NPR's Arun Rath talks with OSCE's Michael Bociurkiw about the investigation.
 

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blindness

May 26, 2014 — When Milena Channing was 29 years old she was blinded by a stroke. But the injury left her with connections from her eyes to the part of the brain that detects motion.
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Feb 5, 2014 — People who are blind from birth are often better than sighted people at processing certain aspects of sound. A mouse study hints at why: Even a few days in the dark helped "rewire" the auditory center of an adult animal's brain.
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Nov 14, 2013 — When Albert Rizzi's seeing-eye dog, Doxy, got fidgety during a flight delay, the crew had them both removed from the plane, angering the other passengers.
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May 28, 2013 — Blind entrepreneurs who own vending machines are worried that legislative mandates to replace junk food with more healthful items will impact their business. In Oregon, the vendors are collaborating with health officials to find a happy medium.
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May 8, 2013 — Supplements with the antioxidant lutein and omega-3 fatty acids didn't stop age-related macular degeneration, the leading cause of blindness in the United States, a new study suggests. But other antioxidants, including vitamins C and E, do seem to help.
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Apr 10, 2013 — Infants received different levels of oxygen to see which was better at preventing blindness without increasing the risk of nerve damage or death. But the federal government says doctors in the study didn't tell parents enough in advance about the "foreseeable risks" to their children.
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Dec 19, 2012 — A study finds that taking aspirin regularly might increase the risk of macular degeneration, a leading cause of blindness in old age. But the evidence so far doesn't prove it's so.
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Aug 14, 2012 — The Blind Stokers Club, founded by Dave White, pairs sighted captains with blind partners on high performance tandem bikes.
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Jan 23, 2012 — Sue Freeman, 78, is one of two women who appear to have unexpectedly regained some of their vision while taking part in a study testing the safety of an embryonic stem-cell therapy. The findings, if confirmed, could mark a landmark step in stem cell therapy, but everyone involved in the work is being very cautious about how they describe these results.
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