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August 27, 2014 | NPR · The report said it couldn't be proven that anyone had died because of wait times at the medical center in Phoenix. On Tuesday, President Obama pledged to do better by vets and announced initiatives.
 
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August 27, 2014 | SCPR · The Los Angeles Unified School District has shut down a half-a-billion-dollar deal with Apple and Pearson to provide classroom technology. Here's what happened.
 
August 27, 2014 | NPR · Schools in Napa Valley are to reopen Wednesday after the area's worst earthquake in decades. Hundreds of buildings and homes were damaged and a lot of rebuilding work remains to be done.
 

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August 26, 2014 | NPR · Dr. Tom Frieden, director of the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, has arrived in West Africa to assess the Ebola outbreak. The situation in Liberia, he says, is "absolutely unprecedented."
 
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August 26, 2014 | NPR · An inquiry in the U.K. has found that more than 1,400 children have been sexually abused by an organized ring of men in the northern English town of Rotherham.
 
August 26, 2014 | NPR · Robert Siegel speaks with Stephen R. Kelly, a visiting professor at Duke University, about how North and South Carolina hope to resolve questions about the border between them. The original border, which was mandated by the British during the colonial era, was never surveyed properly. That's caused headaches ever since the 18th century.
 

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August 23, 2014 | NPR · Nearly 1,500 people have died in the Ebola outbreak, and more nations in the region are closing their borders. NPR's Scott Simon speaks to Africa correspondent Ofeibea Quist-Arcton about the epidemic.
 

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August 24, 2014 | NPR · In the wake of violent clashes between protesters and police in Ferguson, Mo., President Obama is ordering a review of the federal programs that help local police departments purchase military gear.
 

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blindness

May 26, 2014 — When Milena Channing was 29 years old she was blinded by a stroke. But the injury left her with connections from her eyes to the part of the brain that detects motion.
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Feb 5, 2014 — People who are blind from birth are often better than sighted people at processing certain aspects of sound. A mouse study hints at why: Even a few days in the dark helped "rewire" the auditory center of an adult animal's brain.
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Nov 14, 2013 — When Albert Rizzi's seeing-eye dog, Doxy, got fidgety during a flight delay, the crew had them both removed from the plane, angering the other passengers.
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May 28, 2013 — Blind entrepreneurs who own vending machines are worried that legislative mandates to replace junk food with more healthful items will impact their business. In Oregon, the vendors are collaborating with health officials to find a happy medium.
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May 8, 2013 — Supplements with the antioxidant lutein and omega-3 fatty acids didn't stop age-related macular degeneration, the leading cause of blindness in the United States, a new study suggests. But other antioxidants, including vitamins C and E, do seem to help.
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Apr 10, 2013 — Infants received different levels of oxygen to see which was better at preventing blindness without increasing the risk of nerve damage or death. But the federal government says doctors in the study didn't tell parents enough in advance about the "foreseeable risks" to their children.
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Dec 19, 2012 — A study finds that taking aspirin regularly might increase the risk of macular degeneration, a leading cause of blindness in old age. But the evidence so far doesn't prove it's so.
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Aug 14, 2012 — The Blind Stokers Club, founded by Dave White, pairs sighted captains with blind partners on high performance tandem bikes.
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Jan 23, 2012 — Sue Freeman, 78, is one of two women who appear to have unexpectedly regained some of their vision while taking part in a study testing the safety of an embryonic stem-cell therapy. The findings, if confirmed, could mark a landmark step in stem cell therapy, but everyone involved in the work is being very cautious about how they describe these results.
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