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August 1, 2014 | NPR · Renee Montagne talks with the head of the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, Dr. Thomas Frieden, for the latest news about the Ebola outbreak in West Africa.
 
August 1, 2014 | NPR · CIA director John Brennan apologized to Sen. Dianne Feinstein, who had accused the CIA of spying on her committee's computers. Brennan at first denied it.
 
August 1, 2014 | NPR · It's one of the most popular items, but often it seems to be as far as humanly possible from the entrance. The Planet Money team looks at two very different theories about why that is.
 

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August 1, 2014 | NPR · House Republicans are delaying their August recess, sticking around Washington to try passing a bill meant to address the border crisis. Democrats and President Obama have already voiced their opposition to the bill on the table.
 
August 1, 2014 | NPR · Regular political commentators, E.J. Dionne of The Washington Post and David Brooks of The New York Times, discuss the beleaguered border bill in the House and the shattered cease-fire in Gaza.
 
August 1, 2014 | NPR · Fighting in Gaza took an ominous turn Friday, as a 72-hour humanitarian cease-fire fell apart within 90 minutes and the Israeli military announced its belief that one of its soldiers was captured by Hamas militants.
 

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July 26, 2014 | NPR · Hezbollah has been a longtime ally of Hamas, but during this most recent conflict between Israel and Gaza they've taken a sideline role. NPR's Scott Simon talks to the BBC's Kim Ghattas in Beirut.
 

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July 27, 2014 | NPR · Fighting in Ukraine near the crash site of Malaysia Airlines Flight MH17 has international investigators staying away. NPR's Arun Rath talks with OSCE's Michael Bociurkiw about the investigation.
 

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learning

Jun 30, 2014 — When researchers asked young children to figure out an experiment using cause and effect, they did a much better job than young adults. That may be because their thinking is more flexible and fluid.
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Feb 14, 2014 — People with dyslexia take longer to alternate their attention between visual and audio cues, researchers say. That's particularly true if they have to attend to a sound after seeing something. That difference may provide clues to better treatments for dyslexia.
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Dec 9, 2013 — Students around the country are gearing up for final exams, including often-disparaged multiple choice tests. Is their bad rap deserved? Commentator Tania Lombrozo looks at some research suggesting it's not.
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Oct 3, 2013 — Matt Haimovitz is 42 and a world-renowned cellist. His mother took him to many concerts as a kid, but nothing in his family history explains where he got his extraordinary talent. And that's typical, says Ellen Winner, a psychology professor at Boston College who has spent much of her career studying prodigies.
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Sep 2, 2013 — Even infants too young to discern the meaning of words seem better able to learn while listening to the sound of human speech than while listening to nonsense — speech run backward. Little surprise there, perhaps, but a study shows that recordings of lemur calls spark learning, too.
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Aug 4, 2013 — Some birds can dance. These dancing birds can also learn to make vocal sounds by listening to others. They share this ability with humans. But our primate cousins don't seem to be so endowed. Alva NoŽ asks if there is, indeed, a connection between vocal learning and the ability to dance.
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May 16, 2013 — The results are preliminary, and alpha parents seeking an edge for their children shouldn't risk electrocution. Still, the findings are provocative and may lead researchers down a new road.
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May 6, 2013 — In elementary school, girls often outperform boys on reading and math tests. Many factors shape academic performance, but two economists say one reason for the disparity might be that parents spend more time reading with girls and teaching them the alphabet and numbers.
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Nov 12, 2012 — For the most part in American culture, intellectual struggle in school children is seen as an indicator of weakness, while in Eastern cultures it is not only tolerated, it is often used to measure emotional strength.
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Feb 2, 2012 — When Koko the gorilla plays tones on a recorder, she skillfully controls her breathing patterns. Commentator Barbara J. King explains why this is unexpected for a gorilla — and what it may mean for challenging ourselves to learn new skills throughout life.
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