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April 17, 2014 | NPR · Scientists and food activists are launching a campaign to promote seeds that can be freely shared, rather than protected through patents and licenses. They call it the Open Source Seed Initiative.
 
April 17, 2014 | NPR · Brazil is the spiritual home of soccer and a world powerhouse in the sport. It's woven into the Brazilian psyche. Wins and losses have had repercussions in other realms — including politics.
 
April 17, 2014 | NPR · Last week marked another low-point in the Syrian civil war. A unidentified gunman assassinated a Dutch priest in the city of Homs. Father Frans van der Lugt had lived in Syria for nearly five decades.
 

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April 16, 2014 | NPR · Ukrainian tanks arrived in the city of Kramatorsk Wednesday morning. By the time they rolled out of the city, they were flying Russian flags. People in Kramatorsk tell the story of what happened.
 
April 16, 2014 | NPR · NATO has announced a strengthening of its forces near the alliance's eastern border. Gen. George Joulwan, the former NATO supreme allied commander for Europe, discusses the plan.
 
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April 16, 2014 | NPR · A 325 million-year-old fossil find shows that the gill structures of modern sharks are actually quite different from their ancient ancestors.
 

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April 12, 2014 | NPR · As pro-Russia demonstrators continue their tense standoff in Eastern Ukraine, police are conspicuously absent from city streets.
 

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April 13, 2014 | NPR · As the anniversary of last year's marathon bombing approaches, NPR's Rachel Martin speaks with correspondent Carrie Johnson about the investigation and legal wrangling yet to come.
 

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influenza

Mar 18, 2014 — A look back confirms that adults treated with Tamiflu, Relenza or a related drug were half as likely to die in the hospital as those who caught the pandemic flu strain and weren't treated.
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Mar 13, 2014 — It sounds like a good idea: anticipating flu's spread by monitoring a region's online searches. But sometimes a sneeze is just a cold.
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Feb 20, 2014 — Middle-aged and younger adults are being hospitalized at much higher rates than usual. Lower vaccination rates appear to be one reason behind the trend.
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Feb 16, 2014 — Scientists have apparently been wrong about where new flu viruses come from, and they've underestimated the viruses' connection to horses. The dogma is that new viruses always incubate in wild migratory birds first, then get into domestic poultry, and then jump into mammals — especially pigs and humans.
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Feb 13, 2014 — Young people are usually less likely to become seriously ill with flu, but this season looks like an exception to that rule. Blame the H1N1 strain. Even though the flu vaccine is less than perfect, getting a shot each year can make the illness less severe, doctors say.
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Sep 26, 2013 — Even though influenza is one of the most common illnesses, researchers say they still have a lot to learn about it. In a recent study, dozens of volunteers agreed to be infected with the swine flu so doctors could see what happened.
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Apr 24, 2013 — Concerns about the flu have intensified as the cases and fatalities mount. Transmission of the virus between birds and humans appears to happen fairly easily. It's unclear whether it can spread from one person to another.
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Mar 8, 2013 — Why do people in Boston get the flu when it's cold, while people in Senegal get sick when it's hot? Humidity is a big part of the explanation. But how flu spreads in the tropics and more temperate climates appears to be different.
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Jan 18, 2013 — The Food and Drug Administration just approved a flu vaccine made by cells taken from the fall armyworm, an agricultural pest. The cells produce copies of a piece of the flu virus's outer coat that primes the immune system. Conventional vaccines use the whole virus and take longer to produce.
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Jan 15, 2013 — As students return to class from winter break, campus health official are trying to avert an outbreak. Colleges in Boston are especially worried after the mayor's declaration last week of a public health emergency in the city.
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