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August 1, 2014 | NPR · Renee Montagne talks with the head of the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, Dr. Thomas Frieden, for the latest news about the Ebola outbreak in West Africa.
 
August 1, 2014 | NPR · CIA director John Brennan apologized to Sen. Dianne Feinstein, who had accused the CIA of spying on her committee's computers. Brennan at first denied it.
 
August 1, 2014 | NPR · It's one of the most popular items, but often it seems to be as far as humanly possible from the entrance. The Planet Money team looks at two very different theories about why that is.
 

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August 1, 2014 | NPR · House Republicans are delaying their August recess, sticking around Washington to try passing a bill meant to address the border crisis. Democrats and President Obama have already voiced their opposition to the bill on the table.
 
August 1, 2014 | NPR · Regular political commentators, E.J. Dionne of The Washington Post and David Brooks of The New York Times, discuss the beleaguered border bill in the House and the shattered cease-fire in Gaza.
 
August 1, 2014 | NPR · Fighting in Gaza took an ominous turn Friday, as a 72-hour humanitarian cease-fire fell apart within 90 minutes and the Israeli military announced its belief that one of its soldiers was captured by Hamas militants.
 

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July 26, 2014 | NPR · Hezbollah has been a longtime ally of Hamas, but during this most recent conflict between Israel and Gaza they've taken a sideline role. NPR's Scott Simon talks to the BBC's Kim Ghattas in Beirut.
 

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July 27, 2014 | NPR · Fighting in Ukraine near the crash site of Malaysia Airlines Flight MH17 has international investigators staying away. NPR's Arun Rath talks with OSCE's Michael Bociurkiw about the investigation.
 

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influenza

Jun 27, 2014 — The live vaccine nose spray protects children better, a federal panel says, but pediatricians aren't sold. They say it's too risky for the many children with asthma or compromised immunity.
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Mar 18, 2014 — A look back confirms that adults treated with Tamiflu, Relenza or a related drug were half as likely to die in the hospital as those who caught the pandemic flu strain and weren't treated.
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Mar 13, 2014 — It sounds like a good idea: anticipating flu's spread by monitoring a region's online searches. But sometimes a sneeze is just a cold.
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Feb 20, 2014 — Middle-aged and younger adults are being hospitalized at much higher rates than usual. Lower vaccination rates appear to be one reason behind the trend.
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Feb 16, 2014 — Scientists have apparently been wrong about where new flu viruses come from, and they've underestimated the viruses' connection to horses. The dogma is that new viruses always incubate in wild migratory birds first, then get into domestic poultry, and then jump into mammals — especially pigs and humans.
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Feb 13, 2014 — Young people are usually less likely to become seriously ill with flu, but this season looks like an exception to that rule. Blame the H1N1 strain. Even though the flu vaccine is less than perfect, getting a shot each year can make the illness less severe, doctors say.
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Sep 26, 2013 — Even though influenza is one of the most common illnesses, researchers say they still have a lot to learn about it. In a recent study, dozens of volunteers agreed to be infected with the swine flu so doctors could see what happened.
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Apr 24, 2013 — Concerns about the flu have intensified as the cases and fatalities mount. Transmission of the virus between birds and humans appears to happen fairly easily. It's unclear whether it can spread from one person to another.
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Mar 8, 2013 — Why do people in Boston get the flu when it's cold, while people in Senegal get sick when it's hot? Humidity is a big part of the explanation. But how flu spreads in the tropics and more temperate climates appears to be different.
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Jan 18, 2013 — The Food and Drug Administration just approved a flu vaccine made by cells taken from the fall armyworm, an agricultural pest. The cells produce copies of a piece of the flu virus's outer coat that primes the immune system. Conventional vaccines use the whole virus and take longer to produce.
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