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monsanto

Jun 19, 2013 — The prize is sometimes called the "Nobel Prize for food and agriculture." And this year's winners include Monsanto executive Robert Fraley, a pioneer in genetically engineered crops. If there's a single person who personifies the company's controversial role in American agriculture, it's probably Fraley.
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Jun 12, 2013 — Monsanto has said that it won't sue anyone for accidentally growing trace amounts of its patented crops. Now, that promise is legally binding, a federal appeals court says.
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Feb 18, 2013 — On its surface, the case is about whether farmers can use seeds derived from patented crops. But the bigger question is, how much control does a company have over its patented products once they're in the hands of consumers?
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Jan 15, 2013 — Many farmers are worried that the biotech giant will sue them if a patented gene gets accidentally incorporated into their crops. But in a departure, one Monsanto lawyer says that only farmers that specifically take advantage of the company's technology would face a lawsuit.
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Oct 18, 2012 — While there's hot debate over whether genetically modified food should be labeled or is killing us, there are some questions we can definitely answer. We're putting a stop to some of the myths about genetically modified seeds and when farmers can be sued over them.
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Oct 16, 2012 — Whether food giant Monsanto's practice of patenting crop seeds is legal when farmers have little opportunity to find alternatives may finally get a review from the Supreme Court this year. It has agreed to hear a case in which a farmer planting Monsanto seeds without paying.
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Mar 27, 2012 — A coalition calling itself Just Label It released the results today of a survey it commissioned from The Mellman Group, a national pollster. The survey found that 91 percent of voters favor the labeling of food with genetically modified ingredients.
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Feb 27, 2012 — The Organic Seed Growers and Trade Association and several other plaintiff growers do not use Monsanto seeds, but had hoped that the federal judge would agree that Monsanto should not be allowed to sue them if pollen from the company's patented crops happened to drift into their fields.
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