Latest News from NPR

on:

NCPR is supported by:

 
Hourly Newscast
4 min., 45 sec.

Programs

Latest program rundown

Coming up:

Latest Features:
Tommy Trenchard for NPR
August 28, 2014 | NPR · For the first time, researchers have tracked the spread of Ebola, almost in real time, during an outbreak. The virus is quickly changing its genetic code. But it's unclear what the mutations mean.
 
August 29, 2014 | NPR · French President Francois Hollande is under pressure to fix the country's economy, which is overburdened by regulation and failing a generation of young people. He's also facing calls for austerity.
 
Getty Images
August 29, 2014 | NPR · Congressman and former Republican vice presidential nominee Paul Ryan discusses his new book, The Way Forward: Renewing the American Idea.
 

Latest program rundown

Coming up:

Latest Features:
August 30, 2014 | NPR · In Ukraine, worried officials in the southeastern part of the country beefed up their defenses on Saturday as rebel forces slowly moved west following the recent capture of a strategic seaside town.
 
August 30, 2014 | NPR · Arun Rath talks to former U.S. Ambassador to Ukraine Steven Pifer about NATO and EU options for confronting Russian aggression in Ukraine.
 
August 30, 2014 | NPR · More than 500 people may have traveled from the U.K. to Syria to fight in its civil war. Arun Rath talks to Jessica Stern, author of Terror In The Name Of God, about how it's drawing Westerners.
 

Latest Saturday rundown




WE Saturday Feature

August 30, 2014 | NPR · Ukrainian forces are defending the port city of Novoazovsk from what they say is a Russian invasion. Scott Simon talks to correspondent Soraya Sarhaddi Nelson.
 

Latest Sunday rundown


WE Sunday Feature

August 24, 2014 | NPR · In the wake of violent clashes between protesters and police in Ferguson, Mo., President Obama is ordering a review of the federal programs that help local police departments purchase military gear.
 

Latest program rundown

Coming up:

end of life care

Aug 27, 2014 — The company Vital Decisions hires social workers to help people make end-of-life plans in advance, over the phone. But the counselors are paid by insurers. Critics see a conflict of interest.
Launch in player | Comments |
Jul 1, 2014 — There's good news and bad news about aging boomers, a Census Bureau report finds. They're drinking less and voting more, but they're also heavier, which could mean less independence later.
Comments |
Jun 23, 2014 — After a suicide, family members are often devastated. Depression rates are much higher than when a loved one dies naturally. But Sandy Bem's family says her approach to suicide helped them mourn.
Launch in player | Comments |
Jun 9, 2014 — Most people don't want to die in the hospital hooked up to machines, but it can be hard to make those wishes known. A doctor's order with more force than an advance directive can help, a study finds.
Comments |
May 29, 2014 — There's a big difference between the kind of death doctors say they want and the care the average person receives at the end of life. Doctors want less rather than more.
Comments |
Mar 4, 2014 — No one wants to die in the hospital, hooked to a ventilator. But undergoing chemotherapy just to ease symptoms or to buy a bit more time increases that likelihood for patients with terminal cancer.
Comments |
Jan 24, 2014 — Some people might find it easier to write down the care they want and the kind they prefer not to have in living wills. Others might prefer to talk more generally with their relatives about issues like life support.
Comments |
Jan 10, 2014 — If a person loses all brain function, he or she is considered legally dead. But the cases of Jahi McMath and Marlise Muņoz have shown that even though doctors can declare someone dead, families and the courts might not always agree with that definition.
Comments |
Nov 28, 2013 — Most people know about advance directives for end-of-life care. But many don't know about a one-page form designed to let people who are very old or sick specify just how much medical care they want. It's signed by a physician, so it's got teeth. But some disability advocates say it may go too far for some people.
Comments |
Jul 4, 2013 — For 20 years, Linda Smith was a successful ER doctor. But she started to regret doing painful procedures on patients without having the time to sit down and talk with them. So she became a palliative care doctor, one of a growing number helping people deal with life-threatening illnesses.
Launch in player | Comments |
more end of life care from NPR