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August 27, 2014 | NPR · The report said it couldn't be proven that anyone had died because of wait times at the medical center in Phoenix. On Tuesday, President Obama pledged to do better by vets and announced initiatives.
 
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August 27, 2014 | SCPR · The Los Angeles Unified School District has shut down a half-a-billion-dollar deal with Apple and Pearson to provide classroom technology. Here's what happened.
 
August 27, 2014 | NPR · Schools in Napa Valley are to reopen Wednesday after the area's worst earthquake in decades. Hundreds of buildings and homes were damaged and a lot of rebuilding work remains to be done.
 

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August 27, 2014 | NPR · The end of August heralds the start to the final phase of the 2014 election season. As primaries wrap up and candidates ready themselves for November, NPR's Charlie Mahtesian lays out the political landscape.
 
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August 27, 2014 | NPR · Across the nation, state legislators are gearing up for Election Day. And they're well aware that their fates could be tied to national political forces like the president's low approval rating.
 
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August 27, 2014 | NPR · Irn Bru is a neon orange soda that inspires passion and may help explain the strong independent streak in Scotland as it prepares to vote Sept. 18 on whether to break away from the United Kingdom.
 

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August 23, 2014 | NPR · Nearly 1,500 people have died in the Ebola outbreak, and more nations in the region are closing their borders. NPR's Scott Simon speaks to Africa correspondent Ofeibea Quist-Arcton about the epidemic.
 

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August 24, 2014 | NPR · In the wake of violent clashes between protesters and police in Ferguson, Mo., President Obama is ordering a review of the federal programs that help local police departments purchase military gear.
 

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colonoscopy

Apr 29, 2014 — If you didn't know that spit makes a great spot remover or where prison inmates smuggle cellphones, author Mary Roach can fill you in. There's more than digestion going on down there.
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Feb 26, 2014 — Not enough people get screened for colon cancer, and minority or low-income people are even less likely. But simply sending people a test and following up by phone or mail got results.
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Jan 21, 2014 — Screening tests like mammograms and colonoscopies are supposed to be covered under the Affordable Care Act. But some people are finding that they still end up having to pay for anesthesia and other associated services. And not all insurers are covering all forms of birth control.
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Apr 16, 2013 — Save yourself some hassles by checking with your doctor before the test to make sure the office will bill the insurer for the procedure as preventive screening rather than a diagnostic test.
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Mar 28, 2013 — A new campaign is aimed at helping people overcome the stigma of colon cancer screening. Public health advocates have been laboring for years to get people over age 50 in for colonoscopies, but so far just 60 percent have been screened.
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Dec 21, 2012 — There is a strong consensus in favor of colon cancer screening. Educational efforts have fallen short when it comes to meeting public health goals. Why don't more people get tested?
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Jun 5, 2012 — Before a colonoscopy, ask the doctor about his or her detection rate for polyps. And find out how long, on average, the doctor takes to withdraw the scope from the patient. About 10 minutes is the optimal duration, a recent analysis says.
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May 22, 2012 — Over the past decade or so, sigmoidoscopy has been largely abandoned by doctors in the U.S. in favor of colonoscopy to detect and prevent colon cancer. But sigmoidoscopy is easier on patients and is also effective in finding precancerous polyps.
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Mar 20, 2012 — Anesthesia is being used more often for colonoscopies, even if people really don't need it. People in the Northeast are far more likely to be put to sleep, compared to the West Coast, where insurers are less likely to pay.
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